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Tune Identifier:"^old_132nd_dayspsalter$"

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OLD 132ND

Composer: Giles Farnaby (c.1560-16?) Appears in 3 hymnals Tune Sources: Este's Whole Booke of Psalmes (1592) Incipit: 11513 22114 31235 Used With Text: O God, unseen, yet ever near

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O God, unseen, yet ever near

Author: Edward Osler (1798-1863) Appears in 143 hymnals Used With Tune: OLD 132ND
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Thy Word, O Lord, like gentle dews

Author: Charles Bernard Garve; Miss Winkworth Appears in 46 hymnals Lyrics: 1 Thy Word, O Lord, like gentle dews, Falls soft on hearts that pine; Lord, to Thy garden ne'er refuse This heavenly balm of Thine. Watered by Thee, let every tree Forth blossom to Thy praise, By grace of Thine bear fruit divine, Through all the coming days. 2 Thy Word is like a flaming sword, A wedge that cleaveth stone; Keen as a fire, so burns Thy Word, And pierceth flesh and bone. Let it go forth o'er all the earth, To cleanse our hearts within, To show Thy power in Satan's hour And break the might of sin. 3 Thy Word, a wondrous guiding star, On pilgrim hearts doth rise, Leads those to God who dwell afar, And makes the simple wise. Let not its light e'er sink in night; In every spirit shine, That none may miss heaven's final bliss, Led by Thy light divine. Topics: The Means of Grace The Word of God; Sexagesima Sunday Used With Tune: OLD 132D PSALM
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Memento Dom.

Author: M. Appears in 2 hymnals First Line: Remember Davids troubles Lord Lyrics: 1 Remember Davids troubles Lord 2 how to the Lord he swore: And vow'd a vow to Jacobs God, to keepe for evermore. 3 I will not come within my house nor climb up to my bed: 4 Nor let my Temples take their rest nor the eyes in my head. 5 Till I have found out for the Lord, a place to sit thereon: An house for Jacobs God to be an habitation. 6 We heard of it at Ephrata, theredid we heare this sound: and in the fields and forests there, these voices first were found. 7 We will assay and go in now his Tabernacle there: Before his foot-stool to fall down, and worship him in feare. 8 Arise, O Lord, arise, I say, into thy resting place: Both thou and the Arke of thy strength, the presence of thy grace. 9 Let all thy priests be clothed, Lord, with truth and righteousnesse: Let all thy Saints and holy men sing all with joyfullnesse. 10 And for thy servant Davids sake refuse not, Lord, I say. The face of thine annointed Lord not turn thy face away. The second Part: 11 The Lord to David swore in truth and will not shrink from it: Saying the fruit of thy body upon thy seat shall sit. 12 And if thy sonnes my covenant keep, that I shall learne each one: Then shall their sonnes for ever sit upon thy princely throne. 13 The Lord himselfe hath chose Sion, and loves therein to dwellL Saying this is my resting place, I love and like it well. 14 And I will blesse with great increase her victuals every where: And I will satisfie with bread the needy that be there. 15 Yes I will deck and clothe her Priests with my salvation! And all her Saints shall sing for joy of my protection. 16 There will I surely make the horne of David for to bud: For there I have ordain'd for mine a lanterne bright and good. 17 As for his enemies,, I will clothe with shame for evermore: But I will cause his crown to shine more fresh than heretofore. Scripture: Psalm 132 Used With Tune: [Remember Davids troubles Lord]

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O God, unseen, yet ever near

Author: Edward Osler (1798-1863) Hymnal: The Oxford Hymn Book #152a (1920) Languages: English Tune Title: OLD 132ND
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Thy Word, O Lord, like gentle dews

Author: Charles Bernard Garve; Miss Winkworth Hymnal: Church Book #314 (1890) Lyrics: 1 Thy Word, O Lord, like gentle dews, Falls soft on hearts that pine; Lord, to Thy garden ne'er refuse This heavenly balm of Thine. Watered by Thee, let every tree Forth blossom to Thy praise, By grace of Thine bear fruit divine, Through all the coming days. 2 Thy Word is like a flaming sword, A wedge that cleaveth stone; Keen as a fire, so burns Thy Word, And pierceth flesh and bone. Let it go forth o'er all the earth, To cleanse our hearts within, To show Thy power in Satan's hour And break the might of sin. 3 Thy Word, a wondrous guiding star, On pilgrim hearts doth rise, Leads those to God who dwell afar, And makes the simple wise. Let not its light e'er sink in night; In every spirit shine, That none may miss heaven's final bliss, Led by Thy light divine. Topics: The Means of Grace The Word of God; Sexagesima Sunday Languages: English Tune Title: OLD 132D PSALM
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Memento Dom.

Author: M. Hymnal: The Whole Booke of Psalmes #78c (1640) First Line: Remember Davids troubles Lord Lyrics: 1 Remember Davids troubles Lord 2 how to the Lord he swore: And vow'd a vow to Jacobs God, to keepe for evermore. 3 I will not come within my house nor climb up to my bed: 4 Nor let my Temples take their rest nor the eyes in my head. 5 Till I have found out for the Lord, a place to sit thereon: An house for Jacobs God to be an habitation. 6 We heard of it at Ephrata, theredid we heare this sound: and in the fields and forests there, these voices first were found. 7 We will assay and go in now his Tabernacle there: Before his foot-stool to fall down, and worship him in feare. 8 Arise, O Lord, arise, I say, into thy resting place: Both thou and the Arke of thy strength, the presence of thy grace. 9 Let all thy priests be clothed, Lord, with truth and righteousnesse: Let all thy Saints and holy men sing all with joyfullnesse. 10 And for thy servant Davids sake refuse not, Lord, I say. The face of thine annointed Lord not turn thy face away. The second Part: 11 The Lord to David swore in truth and will not shrink from it: Saying the fruit of thy body upon thy seat shall sit. 12 And if thy sonnes my covenant keep, that I shall learne each one: Then shall their sonnes for ever sit upon thy princely throne. 13 The Lord himselfe hath chose Sion, and loves therein to dwellL Saying this is my resting place, I love and like it well. 14 And I will blesse with great increase her victuals every where: And I will satisfie with bread the needy that be there. 15 Yes I will deck and clothe her Priests with my salvation! And all her Saints shall sing for joy of my protection. 16 There will I surely make the horne of David for to bud: For there I have ordain'd for mine a lanterne bright and good. 17 As for his enemies,, I will clothe with shame for evermore: But I will cause his crown to shine more fresh than heretofore. Scripture: Psalm 132 Languages: English Tune Title: [Remember Davids troubles Lord]

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Catherine Winkworth

1827 - 1878 Person Name: Miss Winkworth Translator of "Thy Word, O Lord, like gentle dews" in Church Book Catherine Winkworth (b. Holborn, London, England, 1827; d. Monnetier, Savoy, France, 1878) is well known for her English translations of German hymns; her translations were polished and yet remained close to the original. Educated initially by her mother, she lived with relatives in Dresden, Germany, in 1845, where she acquired her knowledge of German and interest in German hymnody. After residing near Manchester until 1862, she moved to Clifton, near Bristol. A pioneer in promoting women's rights, Winkworth put much of her energy into the encouragement of higher education for women. She translated a large number of German hymn texts from hymnals owned by a friend, Baron Bunsen. Though often altered, these translations continue to be used in many modern hymnals. Her work was published in two series of Lyra Germanica (1855, 1858) and in The Chorale Book for England (1863), which included the appropriate German tune with each text as provided by Sterndale Bennett and Otto Goldschmidt. Winkworth also translated biographies of German Christians who promoted ministries to the poor and sick and compiled a handbook of biographies of German hymn authors, Christian Singers of Germany (1869). Bert Polman ======================== Winkworth, Catherine, daughter of Henry Winkworth, of Alderley Edge, Cheshire, was born in London, Sep. 13, 1829. Most of her early life was spent in the neighbourhood of Manchester. Subsequently she removed with the family to Clifton, near Bristol. She died suddenly of heart disease, at Monnetier, in Savoy, in July, 1878. Miss Winkworth published:— Translations from the German of the Life of Pastor Fliedner, the Founder of the Sisterhood of Protestant Deaconesses at Kaiserworth, 1861; and of the Life of Amelia Sieveking, 1863. Her sympathy with practical efforts for the benefit of women, and with a pure devotional life, as seen in these translations, received from her the most practical illustration possible in the deep and active interest which she took in educational work in connection with the Clifton Association for the Higher Education of Women, and kindred societies there and elsewhere. Our interest, however, is mainly centred in her hymnological work as embodied in her:— (1) Lyra Germanica, 1st Ser., 1855. (2) Lyra Germanica, 2nd Ser., 1858. (3) The Chorale Book for England (containing translations from the German, together with music), 1863; and (4) her charming biographical work, the Christian Singers of Germany, 1869. In a sympathetic article on Miss Winkworth in the Inquirer of July 20, 1878, Dr. Martineau says:— "The translations contained in these volumes are invariably faithful, and for the most part both terse and delicate; and an admirable art is applied to the management of complex and difficult versification. They have not quite the fire of John Wesley's versions of Moravian hymns, or the wonderful fusion and reproduction of thought which may be found in Coleridge. But if less flowing they are more conscientious than either, and attain a result as poetical as severe exactitude admits, being only a little short of ‘native music'" Dr. Percival, then Principal of Clifton College, also wrote concerning her (in the Bristol Times and Mirror), in July, 1878:— "She was a person of remarkable intellectual and social gifts, and very unusual attainments; but what specially distinguished her was her combination of rare ability and great knowledge with a certain tender and sympathetic refinement which constitutes the special charm of the true womanly character." Dr. Martineau (as above) says her religious life afforded "a happy example of the piety which the Church of England discipline may implant.....The fast hold she retained of her discipleship of Christ was no example of ‘feminine simplicity,' carrying on the childish mind into maturer years, but the clear allegiance of a firm mind, familiar with the pretensions of non-Christian schools, well able to test them, and undiverted by them from her first love." Miss Winkworth, although not the earliest of modern translators from the German into English, is certainly the foremost in rank and popularity. Her translations are the most widely used of any from that language, and have had more to do with the modern revival of the English use of German hymns than the versions of any other writer. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ============================ See also in: Hymn Writers of the Church

Edward Osler

1798 - 1863 Person Name: Edward Osler (1798-1863) Author of "O God, unseen, yet ever near" in The Oxford Hymn Book Osler, Edward, was born at Falmouth in January, 1798, and was educated for the medical profession, first by Dr. Carvosso, at Falmouth, and then at Guy's Hospital, London. From 1819 to 1836 he was house surgeon at the Swansea Infirmary. He then removed to London, and devoted himself to literary pursuits. For some time he was associated with the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, both in London and at Bath. In 1841 he became the Editor of the Royal Cornwall Gazette, and took up his residence at Truro. He retained that appointment till his death, at Truro, March 7, 1863. For the Linnaean Society he wrote Burrowing and Boring Marine Animals. He also published Church and Bible; The Voyage: a Poem written at Sea, and in the West Indies, and Illustrated by papers on Natural History, 1830; The Life of Lord Exmouth, 1837, &c. His hymnological work is mainly connected with the Mitre Hymn Book. During 1835-36 he was associated with Prebendary W. J. Hall, the editor, in producing that collection, which was published in 1836 as Psalms and Hymns adapted to The Services of the Church of England. He resided in Mr. Hall's house during the time. From the "hall manuscript" we gather that he contributed 15 versions of the Psalms (5 being rewritten from others), and 50 hymns (a few rewritten). Most of these hymns and Psalm versions, together with others not in the Mitre Hymn Book, were afterwards given in the monthly numbers of his Church and King, from Nov. 1836 to Aug. 1837. The best known of these hymns are, “O God, unseen, yet ever near," and “Worship, honour, glory, blessing." Several of his hymns in common use are:— 1. Father, Whose love and truth fulfil. Holy Baptism. 2. Glory to God! with joyful adoration. Praise to the Father. 3. Great God, o'er earth and heaven supreme. Men the Stewards of God's Bounties. 4. Great God of hosts, our ears have heard. Ps. xliv. Based on the N. Version. 5. Great God, Whose awful mystery. Holy Trinity. 6. I hold the sacred book of God. Martyrs. 7. Jehovah hath spoken, the nations shall hear. Second Advent. 8. Lord, may the inward grace abound. Holy Baptism. 9. May we Thy precepts, Lord, fulfil. Love. 10. Mighty Saviour, gracious King. Advent. 11. 0 God, the help of all Thy Saints. Ps. x. 12. O Thou, the Lord and Life of those. Christ the Life of Men. 13. O Saviour, Who didst come. Easter. 14. Saviour, Whose love could stoop to death. Easter. 15. See, Lord, before Thy mercy seat. For Schools. 16. Set in a high and favoured place. Advent. 17. Wake frem the dead, new life begin. Lent. 18. With trembling awe we come. Lent. Several of these hymns are not in Osier's Church and King. We have ascribed them and others to him on the authority of the "hall MSS." It must be noted also that the text in the Church and King often differs from that in the Mitre. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) Though not mentioned by Julian, perhaps his most enduring contribution to hymnody is the third stanza of "Praise the Lord! Ye Heavens, Adore Him", whose first two stanzas are of anonymous authorship. --Leland Bryant Ross (2019)

Carl Bernhard Garve

1763 - 1841 Person Name: Charles Bernard Garve Author of "Thy Word, O Lord, like gentle dews" in Church Book Garve, Carl Bernhard, was born Jan. 24, 1763, at Jeinsen, near Hannover, where his father was a farmer. He was educated at the Moravian schools in Zeist, and Neuwied, at their Pädagogium at Niesky, and their Seminary at Barby. In 1784 he was appointed one of the tutors at Niesky, and in 1789 at Barby; but as his philosophical lectures were thought rather unsettling in their tendency, he was sent, in 1797, to arrange the documents of the archive at Zeist. After his ordination as diaconus of the Moravian church, he was appointed, in 1799, preacher at Amsterdam; in 1801 at Ebersdorf (where he was also inspector of the training school); in 1809 at Berlin; and in 1816 at Neusalza on the Oder. Feeling the burden of years and infirmities he resigned the active duties of the ministry in 1836, and retired to Herrnhut, where he died June 21, 1841. (Koch, vii. 334-342; (Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie, viii. 392-94, &c.) Garve ranks as the most important of recent Moravian hymnwriters, Albertini being perhaps his superior in poetical gifts, but certainly not in adaptability to church use. His better productions are almost entirely free from typically Moravian features; and in them Holy Scripture is used in a sound and healthful spirit. They are distinguished by force and at the same time elegance of style, and are full of deep love and devotion to the Saviour. Many of them have passed into the German Evangelical hymnbooks, no less than 36 being included in the Berlin Gesange-Buch 1829; and of those noted below No. i. is to be found in almost all recent German collections. They appeared mostly in the two following collections, both of which are to be found in the Town Library, Hamburg: (1) Christliche Gesänge, Görlitz, 1825, with 303 hymns, a few being recasts from other authors. (2) Brüdergesange, Gnadau, 1827, with 65 hymns intended principally for use in the Moravian Communion. Garve's hymns in English common use are:— i. Dein Wort, 0 Herr, ist milder Thau. Holy Scripture. Perhaps his finest hymn. 1825, as above, p. 51, in 7 st. of 8 l. Included, as No. 410, in the Berlin Geistliche Lieder S., ed. 1863, and in the German hymnbooks for Hannover, 1883, for the kingdom of Saxony, 1883, for the province of Saxony, 1882, &c." Translated as:— 1. Thy Word, 0 Lord, like gentle dews. A good translation of st. i.-iii, by Miss Winkworth, in the first Ser., 1855, of her Lyra Germanica, p. 36. In the Pennsylvania Lutheran Church Book, 1868, it is No. 314 in full, but rewritten to D.C.M. In 1864 it was included, altered, and with 11. 5-8 of each stanza omitted, as No. 681 in Hymns of the Spirit, Boston, U. S., and this has been repeated in Dr. Martineau's Hymns of Praise & Prayer, 1873, and Dr. Allon's Children's Worship, 1878. 2. Thy Word, 0 Lord, is gentle dew. A good translation of st. i.-iii., based on the Lyra Germanica, by Miss Winkworth, as No. 102 in her Chorale Book for England, 1863, and thence, in the Ohio Lutheran Hymnal, 1880. ii. Hallelujah, Christus lebt. Easter. 1825, as above, p. 105, in 8 st. of 6 1. Included in Knapp's Evangelical Lutheran Songbook, 1850, No. 565. Translated as:— Hallelujah! Jesus lives! A good translation (omitting st. iv., vi.) by Miss Borthwick, in the 4th Ser., 1862, of the Hymns from the Land of Luther, p. 30 (1884, p. 201). In Lyra Messianica, 1864, p. 295, and in G. S. Jellicoe's Collection, 1867, No. 103, it begins, "Alleluia ! Jesus lives." iii. O Vater der Gemeine. Trinity Sunday. 1825, as above, p. 18, in 3 st. of 7 l. Included as No. 107 in Knapp's Evangelischer Lieder-Schatz, 1837. Translated as: -- Father of all created. In full, as No. 159, in Dr. Pagenstecher's Collection, 1864, signed " F. C. C." Another translation is, "0 Father, we adore Thee," in the British Herald, Oct. 1866, p. 324, repeated as No. 416 in Reid's Praise Book, 1872. Hymns not in English common use:— « iv. Der Herr ist treu, Der Herr ist ewig treu. God's Faithfulness. 1825, p. 5, in 6 st., repeated in the Berlin Gesang-Buch, 1829, No. 60, beginning "Gott ist treu." Translated by N. L. Frothingham, 1870, p. 253. v. Geduld! Geduld! ob's stürmisch weht. Trust in God. 1825, p. 180, in 3 st., repeated in the Berlin Gesang-Buch 1829, No. 593, beginning "Geduld! wie sehr der Sturm auch weht." Translated by N. L. Frothingham, 1870, p. 265. vi. Sagt was hat die weite Welt. Holy Scripture. 1825, p 49, in 6 st. Translated as “Tell me, can the world display," in the British Herald, Nov. 1866, p. 360, repeated as No. 420 in Reid's Praise Book, 1872. vii. Wer bin ich, Herr, in deinem Licht. Self-Examination, 1825, p. 216, in 15 st. Translated by N. L. Frothingham, 1870, p. 258. viii. Zur Arbeit winkt mir mein Beruf. Before Work, 1825, p. 233, in 9 st. Translated by E. Massie, l861. A hymn sometimes ascribed to Garve is noted under "Gib deinen Frieden uns." [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)