Cabeza ensangrentada

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Translator: George P. Simmonds

At four years, George sang hymns with great devotion and enthusiasm. When he was ten he felt called to be a missionary. He retained his love for the Lord and for music throughout his life. So much so, that after the age of one hundred years old even sang solos in large meetings and on television. He began his work as a missionary, along with his wife, Nessie, in Ecuador. Then explored the Amazon area and across the continent. Collaborated in the compilation of "Hymns of the Christian Life." He also worked with the Bible Societies in several South American countries. He then served as pastor of a Hispanic church in the United States of America. He was a prolific translator of 800 hymns and choral songs. He used some pseudonyms as G. Paul S.… Go to person page >

Author: St. Bernard of Clairvaux

Bernard of Clairvaux, saint, abbot, and doctor, fills one of the most conspicuous positions in the history of the middle ages. His father, Tecelin, or Tesselin, a knight of great bravery, was the friend and vassal of the Duke of Burgundy. Bernard was born at his father's castle on the eminence of Les Fontaines, near Dijon, in Burgundy, in 1091. He was educated at Chatillon, where he was distinguished for his studious and meditative habits. The world, it would be thought, would have had overpowering attractions for a youth who, like Bernard, had all the advantages that high birth, great personal beauty, graceful manners, and irresistible influence could give, but, strengthened in the resolve by night visions of his mother (who had died in 1… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Cabeza ensangrentada, Herida por mi bien
Title: Cabeza ensangrentada
Latin Title: Salve caput cruentatum
Translator: George P. Simmonds
Author: St. Bernard of Clairvaux
Meter: 7.6.7.6 D
Language: Spanish
Copyright: Traducción © renovado 1967 George P. Simmonds. Propiedad de Elizabeth R. Donaldson

Tune

PASSION CHORALE (Hassler)

The tune HERZLICH TUT MICH VERLANGEN has been associated with Gerhardt's text ["O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden"] since they were first published together in 1656. The tune's first association with a sacred text was its attachment in 1913 [sic: should read 1613] to Christoph Knoll's funeral text "Herzl…

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Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 4 of 4)

Cáliz de Bendiciones #139

Celebremos Su Gloria #203

Himnos de la Iglesia #113

Mil Voces para Celebrar #139

Include 2 pre-1979 instances
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