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Edward Henry Bickersteth

1825 - 1906 Person Name: Edward H. Bickersteth Author of ""Till He Come"" in Church Hymnal, Mennonite Bickersteth, Edward Henry, D.D., son of Edward Bickersteth, Sr. born at Islington, Jan. 1825, and educated at Trinity College, Cambridge (B.A. with honours, 1847; M.A., 1850). On taking Holy Orders in 1848, he became curate of Banningham, Norfolk, and then of Christ Church, Tunbridge Wells. His preferment to the Rectory of Hinton-Martell, in 1852, was followed by that of the Vicarage of Christ Church, Hampstead, 1855. In 1885 he became Dean of Gloucester, and the same year Bishop of Exeter. Bishop Bickersteth's works, chiefly poetical, are:— (l) Poems, 1849; (2) Water from the Well-spring, 1852; (3) The Rock of Ages, 1858 ; (4) Commentary on the New Testament, 1864; (5) Yesterday, To-day, and For Ever, 1867; (6) The Spirit of Life, 1868; (7) The Two Brothers and other Poems, 1871; (8) The Master's Home Call, 1872 ; (9) The Shadowed Home and the Light Beyond, 1874; (10) The Beef and other Parables, 1873; (11) Songs in the House of Pilgrimage, N.D.; (12) From Year to Year, 1883. As an editor of hymnals, Bp. Bickersteth has also been most successful. His collections are:— (1) Psalms & Hymns, 1858, based on his father's Christian Psalmody, which passed through several editions; (2) The Hymnal Companion, 1870; (3) The Hymnal Companion revised and enlarged, 1876. Nos. 2 and 3, which are two editions of the same collection, have attained to an extensive circulation.   [Ch. of England Hymnody.] About 30 of Bp. Bickersteths hymns are in common use. Of these the best and most widely known are:—" Almighty Father, hear our cry"; "Come ye yourselves apart and rest awhile"; "Father of heaven above"; "My God, my Father, dost Thou call"; "O Jesu, Saviour of the lost"; "Peace, perfect peace"; "Rest in the Lord"; "Stand, Soldier of the Cross"; " Thine, Thine, for ever"; and "Till He come.” As a poet Bp. Bickersteth is well known. His reputation as a hymn-writer has also extended far and wide. Joined with a strong grasp of his subject, true poetic feeling, a pure rhythm, there is a soothing plaintiveness and individuality in his hymns which give them a distinct character of their own. His thoughts are usually with the individual, and not with the mass: with the single soul and his God, and not with a vast multitude bowed in adoration before the Almighty. Hence, although many of his hymns are eminently suited to congregational purposes, and have attained to a wide popularity, yet his finest productions are those which are best suited for private use. -John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================= Bickersteth, Edward Henry, p. 141, ii. Bishop Bickersteth's 1890 edition of his Hymnal Companion is noted on p. 1312, i., and several of his own hymns and translations, which appear therein for the first time, are annotated in this Appendix. One of these, "All-merciful, Almighty Lord," for the Conv. of St. Paul, was written for the 1890 edition of Hymnal Companion. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ================== Bickersteth, B. H., p. 141, ii. Bp. Bickersteth died in London, May 16, 1906. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Timothy R. Matthews

1826 - 1910 Person Name: Timothy Richard Matthews, 1826-1910 Composer of "REYNOLDSTONE" in The Hymnary of the United Church of Canada Timothy Richard Matthews MusB United Kingdom 1826-1910. Born at Colmworth, England, son of the Colmworth rector, he attended the Bedford and Gonville Schools and Caius College, Cambridge. In 1853 he became a private tutor to the family of Rev Lord Wriothesley Russell, a canon of St. George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle, where he studied under organist, George Elvey, subsequently a lifelong friend. He married Margaret Mary Thompson, and they had 11 children: Norton, Mary, George, Cecil, Evelyn, Eleanor, Anne, Arthur, Wilfred, Stephen, and John. Matthews served as Curate and Curate-in-Charge of St Mary’s Church, Nottingham (1853-1869). While there, he founded the Nottingham Working Men’s Institute. He became Rector at North Coates, Lincolnshire (1869-1907). He retired in 1907 to live with his eldest son, Norton, at Tetney vicarage. He edited the “North Coates supplemental tune book” and “Village organist”. An author, arranger, and editor, he composed morning and evening services, chants, and responses, earning a reputation for simple but effective hymn tunes, writing 100+. On a request he wrote six tunes for a children’s hymnal in one day. He composed a Christmas carol and a few songs. His sons, Norton, and Arthur, were also known as hymn tune composers. He died at Tetney, Lincolnshire, England. John Perry

F. M. Owen

1842 - 1883 Person Name: Frances Mary Owen, 1842-1883 Author of "When Thy soldiers take their swords" in The Book of Praise Frances Mary Owen, née Synge, wife of the Rev. J. A. Owen, Assistant Master at Cheltenham College, was born April 16, 1842, and died June 19, 1883. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

William Dalrymple Maclagan

1826 - 1910 Person Name: W. D. Maclagan Author of "Holy Spirit, Lord of love " in The Church Hymnal Maclagan, William Dalrymple , D.D., son of David Maclagan, M.D., was born in Edinburgh, June 18, 1826. In early life he entered the army, and served for some time in India. Retiring with the rank of lieutenant, he entered St. Peter's College, Cambridge, where he graduated B.A. 1856 and M.A. in 1860. Taking Holy Orders, he was curate of St. Saviour's, Paddington, 1856-58, and St. Stephen's, Marylebone, 1858-60. He then became Secretary to the London Diocesan Church Building Society, from 1860 to 1865; curate of Enfield, 1865-69; Rector of Newington, 1869-75; and Vicar of Kensington, 1875-78. He was also Hon. Chaplain to the Queen, and Prebendary of Reculverland in St. Paul's Cathedral, London. In 1878 he was consecrated Bishop of Lichfield. Bishop Maclagan's work has been mainly of a practical character, and his publications are few. The few hymns which he has written have been received with great favour, and create a desire for more of the same kind and quality. The following are in common use.:— 1. Again the trumpet sounds. Missions. Written about 1870. Appeared in the Hymns Ancient & Modern Hymns Ancient & Modern series of Hymns for Mission Services. 1871. 2. Be still, my soul, for God is near. Holy Communion. Part ii. is “O Body, broken for my sake." Written about 1873 for St. Mary's, Newington. In Thring's Collection, 1882. 3. Holy Spirit, Lord of love. Confirmation. Written about 1873, and published in Mrs. C. Brock's Children's Hymn Book, 1884. 4. It is finished, blessed Jesus [Saviour]. Good Friday. Written for Hymns Ancient & Modern, 1875. In several collections. 5. Lord, when Thy Kingdom comes, remember me. Good Friday. Written for the 1875 ed. of Hymns Ancient & Modern. Sometimes given in two parts: Pt. ii. Beginning, “Lord, when with dying lips my prayer is said." 6. The Saints of God their conflict past. All Saints. First published in Church Bells, 1870; and again in the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge Church Hymns, 1871. 7. What thanks and praise to Thee we owe. St. Luke. Written for the 1875 edition of Hymns Ancient & Modern These hymns are of more than usual merit, being characterized by great simplicity, tenderness, and fervour. The special season or purpose is clearly indicated, and its lessons earnestly enforced. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ============= Maclagan, Abp. W. D., pp. 709, i.; 1578, ii. At the present time all Abp. Maclagan's hymns are in common use, and most of his tunes likewise. With regard to the latter, it is exceptional to find so many tunes by the author of popular hymns sharing the same popularity in the principal hymnals. In Church Hymnal, 1903, and Hymns Ancient & Modern, 1904, combined, there are eight of his tunes, whilst the hymns are six in all. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Arthur Penrhyn Stanley

1815 - 1881 Person Name: Arthur P. Stanley Translator (from Latin) of "Day of Wrath, O Dreadful Day!" in The Cyber Hymnal Stanley, Arthur Penrhyn, Dean of Westminster, one of the most distinguished English Churchmen of the nineteenth century, was the son of Rev. Edward Stanley, Bishop of Norwich, and was born at Alderly, in Cheshire, December 13, 1815. At the age of fourteen he became a pupil of Dr. Arnold, of Rugby, in whose famous school he displayed a strength of moral character which was a prophecy of the frank and courageous man that was to be. He took well-nigh all the honors at Oxford, where he graduated in 1837. Entering the ministry of the Church of England, he filled successively various positions of honor and responsibility until in 1855 he was appointed Regius Professor of Ecclesiastical History at Oxford. In 1864 he became Dean of Westminster. His marriage that same year to Lady Augusta Bruce, a personal friend and attendant of Queen Victoria, increased the freedom and intimacy of his already cordial relations with the royal family. He died July 18, 1881. He was a Churchman of broad and liberal views. His catholicity of spirit was one of his most notable characteristics. His contributions to theological literature are numerous and well known. His Life of Dr. Arnold, of Rugby, 1844, is one of the most successful volumes of biography in the English language. Among his historical writings his lectures on the Eastern Church, 1861, Jewish Church (two volumes), 1863-65, and the Church of Scotland, 1868, are accounted as of highest value. He is the author of about a dozen hymns, and of several translations. These, although of a high order of excellence, do not take rank with his prose writings, which for choice English diction, scholarly erudition, and Christian catholicity are not surpassed, perhaps, by anything in the religious literature of England in the nineteenth century. Day of wrath, O dreadful day 599 He is gone; a cloud of light 170 O Master, it is good to be 131 From Hymn Writers of the Church by Charles S. Nutter, 1915 ============================ Stanley, Arthur Penrhyn, D.D., was born at Alderley, in Cheshire, Dec. 13, 1815. His father, Edward Stanley, was the son of Sir Edward Stanley of Alderley, and younger brother of the first Lord Stanley of Alderley, and was rector of the parish until 1837, when he became Bishop of Norwich. His mother, Catherine Stanley, was daughter of tho Rev. Oswald Leycester, Rector of Stoke-upon-Tern, Shropshire. Arthur Stanley received his early education under the superintendence of his father; but in 1829 he was sent to Rugby to be under the direct charge of Dr. Arnold, who bad been appointed to the head-mastership the year before, and of whom Mr. Stanley had been an early friend and admirer. Arthur Stanley bore the stamp of Rugby and of its great headmaster to the end of his life. In 1834 he went up to Oxford, having won a Balliol scholarship, the "blue ribbon of undergraduate life," and commenced a career of unusual brilliancy at the University. He gained the Newdigate prize for English Verse (the subject being The Gypsies); the Ireland scholarship (the highest test of Greek scholarship), and a First Class in Classical Honours, all in 1837. He won the Prize for the Latin Essay in 1839, the Prize for the English Essay, and the Ellerton Prize for the Theological Essay in 1840, and was in the same year elected to a Fellowship at University College. He was then appointed College Tutor, and held that office for twelve years. In 1845-6 he was Select Preacher for the University. From 1850 to 1852 he was Secretary to the Oxford University Commissioners. In 1851 he was appointed Canon of Canterbury, and held that post until 1855, when he was elected Regius Professor of Ecclesiastical History at Oxford, to which a Canonry at Christ Church was attached. He was also chosen in 1858 Examining Chaplain to the Bishop of London, his fellow Rugbeian, Dr. Tait. These offices he held until 1863, when, on the elevation of Dean Trench to the Archbishopric of Dublin, he was appointed to the Deanery of Westminster. In the same year he married Lady Augusta Bruce, a sister of the Earl of Elgin, and a personal friend and attendant of Queen Victoria. This marriage brought him into still closer relation with the Court, at which he had before been so highly valued, that he had been twice chosen to accompany the Prinoe of Wales in his travels in the East. He was singularly happy in his married life, and felt the death of Lady Augusta, which occurred in 1876, as an irreparable loss. In 1872, he took part in the Old Catholic Congress at Cologne; and at the close of the same year he was again appointed Select Preacher, not, however, without considerable opposition being made to the appointment on account of the Dean's theological views; the vote, however, was carried by 349 against 287. In 1875 he was installed Lord Rector of the University of St. Andrews, having received the degree of LL.D. from that University four years previously. He died at the Deanery, Westminster, on July 18, 1881, after a short illness. Dr. Stanley was a voluminous and very popular writer, his pure and picturesque style being singularly fascinating. The first work by which he became known to the literary world was the Life and Correspondence of Dr. Arnold, published in 1844. This is an almost perfect model of biography. Though the writer is distinctly a hero-worshipper, he never allows his worship to violate the rules of good taste, while he brings out all the points in his hero's character most vividly, and exercises a most wise discretion in permitting him, as far as possible, to tell his own tale. This was followed in 1850 by Memoirs of Edward Stanley, Bishop of Norwich, and Catherine Stanley, which is very interesting both for its intrinsic merits, and also as a pious tribute of filial affection; but it does not reach the level of the Life of Arnold. In 1854 appeared the Epistles to the Corinthians, the value of which will be variously estimated according to the theological standpoint of the reader. But his next two works will command the admiration of all persons who are competent to judge. In his Historical Memorials of Canterbury, published in 1854, and Sinai and Palestine in connexion with their History, published in 1856, Dr. Stanley was again on his own proper ground where his almost unique powers of description had their full scope. The former was a very popular work, reaching a 6th edition in 1872; but Sinai and Palestine was still more warmly welcomed, and may be con¬sidered, with the Life of Dr. Arnold, as Dr. Stanley's chef-d'oeuvre. Passing over for the present his sermons, we next come to his Lectures on the History of the Eastern Church, pub. in 1861; this also was very popular, reaching a 5th ed. in 1869. Then followed a series of Lectures on the History of the Jewish Church, in 2 volumes (1863-5). His next publication again showed him at his best. The Historical Memorials of Westminster Abbey, pub. in 1867, may be regarded as a companion volume to the Historical Memorials of Canterbury, and is, at least, worthy of its predecessor. Dr. Stanley attained great eminence as a preacher, especially in his own Abbey. His manner was most solemn and impressive, and his style of composition was exactly suited for a sermon. It is fair to add that sermons would also, of course, be the species of composition in which what many considered the most unsatisfactory features of Dr. Stanley's intellectual character, his vagueness of doctrine and extreme breadth of statement, were most conspicuous. He published several volumes of sermons and single sermons. The chief are: Sermons and Essays on the Apostolical Age (1846), Sermons preached in Canterbury Cathedral (1857), Sermons on the Unity of Evangelical and Apostolical Teaching (1859), Sermons in the East preached before the Prince of Wales (1863), Address and Sermons at St. Andrews, 1877. The point of view from which this sketch naturally regards Dean Stanley as a writer is that from which he appears at the least advantage. Thirteen of his hymns which had been published singly have been incorporated in the Westminster Abbey Hymn Book, but none of them have attained any extensive popularity; and, to tell the truth, they do not deserve it. That exquisite taste and felicity of diction which distinguish more or less all his prose writings seem to desert him when he is writing verse. This is all the more strange because one would have said that he regarded outward nature, as well as the works and history of man, with a poet's eye. Like another great writer, Jeremy Taylor, his prose is poetical, but his poetry is prosaic. The divine afflatus is wanting. Of course he always writes as a scholar; hence his translations are more successful than his original hymns; but in neither department has he produced anything that can at all be termed classical; and it is from his general eminence rather than from his contributions to hymnology that he requires even the small space which has been devoted to him in this article. [Rev. J. H. Overton, D.D.] In addition to Dean Stanley's trsanslations from the Latin, and his popular hymns, "He is gone! beyond the skies,'' and "Master, it is good to be," the following are also in common use:— 1. Let us with a gladsome mind. National Hymn. The Accession. This hymn is called "Hymn for the Accession (June 20 2. 0 frail spirit, vital spark. Easter. Given in Macmillan's Magazine, May 1878, and headed "Our Future Hope." 3. Spirit unseen, our spirits' home. Whitsuntide. This hymn was published in Macmillan's Magazine, May, 1879, in 7 stanzas of 8 lines, and 1 stanza of 9 lines, with the following note:—"Manzoni's Hymn for Whitsuntide.” 4. The Lord is come! On Syrian soil. Advent. This hymn appeared in Macmillan's Magazine, Dec. 1872, in 6 stanzas of 8 lines, with the following introduction:— “Hymn for Advent.” 5. When the Paschal evening fell. Holy Communion. This appeared in Macmillan's Magazine, Nov. 1874, in 5 st. of 8 1., 1 st. of 12 1., and 1 st. of 8 1., with this introduction:—" This do in Remembrance of Me. It is intended in the following lines to furnish a sacred hymn founded on the one common idea of commemoration which lies at the basis of all views of the Eucharist, whether material or spiritual, and to express this undoubted intention of the original institution apart from the metaphorical language by which the ordinance is often described." 6. Where is the Christian's Fatherland? The Christian's Fatherland. This poem (it cannot be called a hymn) was given in Macmillan's Magazine, Nov. 1872, in 7 st. of 8 1., with the following introduction:—"The Traveller's Hymn for All Saints' Day. Being an adaptation of Arndt's Poem, 'Was ist des Deutschen Vaterland.'" 7. Where shall we find the Lord? Epiphany. Given in Macmillan's Magazine, March 1880, in 7 st. of 8 1., and introduced thus: —"The Divine Life 8. Where shall we learn to die? Good Friday. This was published in Macmillan's Magazine, March 1880, in 7 st. of 8 1., with the simple heading, "The Perfect Death. Disce mori." 9. Who shall be the last great Seer? St. John Baptist. Appeared in Macmillan's Magazine, July 1879, in 4 st. of 8 1., as a "Hymn for St. John the Baptist Day, June 24." All these hymns were given in full, and without alteration, in the Westminster Abbey Hymn Book, 1883. Their use is mainly confined to that collection. --Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Thomas of Celano

1200 - 1265 Author of "Day of Wrath, O Dreadful Day!" in The Cyber Hymnal Thomas of Celano was born at Celano in the Abruzzi, and joined St. Francis of Assisi c. 1214. He was commissioned by Gregory IX to write the life of St. Francis: the First Legend, 1229; the Second Legend, 1247; and the Tract on the Miracle of St. Francis a few years later. His Legend of St. Clare was composed in 1255. He was probably among the first band of friars to visit Germany, 1221. --The Hymnal 1940 Companion =============================== Thomas of Celano. It is somewhat remarkable that neither the date of the birth nor of the death of this writer, whose name is so intimately associated with the Dies Irae, is on record. He was a native of Celano, a small town near the lake Fucino, in the farther Abruzzo, and hence his name of Thomas of Celano. Several of the inhabitants of this town were driven therefrom by Frederick II. in 1223, and Thomas with the rest. He found his way to Assisi, and became a monk there during the lifetime of St. Francis. The Franciscan Order was established in 1208, Thomas was therefore one of the early students at Assisi. He was subsequently "custos of the convents of Worms, Mentz, and Cologne, and afterwards sole custos of the Rhine districts." The last named appointment he held till 1230, when he returned to Assisi. As intimated above the date of his death is not on record. It is sometimes given as 1255. Thomas also wrote a Life of St. Francis. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix I (1907) See also in: Hymn Writers of the Church

Hugh Davies

1844 - 1907 Arranger of "REYNOLDSTONE" in The Cyber Hymnal

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