Search Results

Scripture:Psalm 48

Planning worship? Check out our sister site, PreachingandWorship.org, for 20+ additional resources related to your search.

Texts

text icon
Text authorities
Text

Psalm 48 Part 1

Author: Isaac Watts Meter: 6.6.8.6 Appears in 300 hymnals Scripture: Psalm 48:1-8 First Line: Great is the Lord our God Lyrics: [Great is the Lord our God, And let his praise be great; He makes his churches his abode, His most delightful seat. These temples of his grace, How beautiful they stand! The honors of our native place, And bulwarks of our land.] In Zion God is known, A refuge in distress; How bright has his salvation shone Through all her palaces! When kings against her joined, And saw the Lord was there, In wild confusion of the mind They fled with hasty fear. When navies tall and proud Attempt to spoil our peace, He sends his tempests roaring loud, And sinks them in the seas. Oft have our fathers told, Our eyes have often seen, How well our God secures the fold Where his own sheep have been. In every new distress We'll to his house repair; We'll think upon his wondrous grace, And seek deliv'rance there. Topics: Enemies destroyed; Delight and safety in the church; Church its beauty; Church is the safety and honor of a nation; Church its worship and order; Gospel worship and order; Nation's honor and safety is the church; Worship and order of the gospel
TextPage scansFlexscoreFlexpresentAudio

Guide Me, O My Great Redeemer

Author: William Williams, 1717-1791; Peter Williams Meter: 8.7.8.7.8.8.7 Appears in 1,729 hymnals Scripture: Psalm 48:14 Lyrics: 1 Guide me, O my great Redeemer, pilgrim through this barren land; I am weak, but you are mighty; hold me with your powerful hand. Bread of heaven, bread of heaven, feed me now and evermore, feed me now and evermore. 2 Open now the crystal fountain, where the healing waters flow. Let the fire and cloudy pillar lead me all my journey through. Strong Deliverer, strong Deliverer, ever be my strength and shield, ever be my strength and shield. 3 When I tread the verge of Jordan, bid my anxious fears subside. Death of death, and hell's Destruction, land me safe on Canaan's side. Songs of praises, songs of praises I will ever sing to you, I will ever sing to you. Topics: Biblical Names & Places Jordan; Bread of Life; Deliverance; Funerals; Walk with God; Biblical Names & Places Jordan; Bread of Life; Deliverance; Funerals; Guidance; Pilgrimage & Conflct; Walk with God Used With Tune: CWM RHONDDA
Text

Psalm 48 Part 2

Author: Isaac Watts Meter: 6.6.8.6 Appears in 187 hymnals Scripture: Psalm 48:10-14 First Line: Far as thy name is known Lyrics: Far as thy name is known, The world declares thy praise; Thy saints, O Lord, before thy throne, Their songs of honor raise. With joy let Judah stand On Zion's chosen hill, Proclaim the wonders of thy hand, And counsels of thy will. Let strangers walk around The city where we dwell, Compass and view thine holy ground, And mark the building well; The orders of thy house, The worship of thy court, The cheerful songs, the solemn vows, And make a fair report. How decent and how wise! How glorious to behold! Beyond the pomp that charms the eyes, And rites adorned with gold. The God we worship now Will guide us till we die, Will be our God while here below, And ours above the sky. Topics: Enemies destroyed; Delight and safety in the church; Church its beauty; Church is the safety and honor of a nation; Church its worship and order; Gospel worship and order; Nation's honor and safety is the church; Worship and order of the gospel

Tunes

tune icon
Tune authorities
Page scansFlexscoreAudio

CWM RHONDDA

Composer: John Hughes Meter: 8.7.8.7.8.8.7 Appears in 259 hymnals Scripture: Psalm 48:14 Tune Key: G Major Incipit: 56511 71232 31643 Used With Text: Guide Me, O My Great Redeemer
FlexscoreAudio

O STORE GUD

Composer: Stuart K. Hine Meter: 11.10.11.10 with refrain Appears in 149 hymnals Scripture: Psalm 48:1 Tune Sources: Swedish folk melody Tune Key: B Flat Major Incipit: 55535 55664 66665 Used With Text: How Great Thou Art
Page scansFlexscoreAudio

AUSTRIA

Composer: Franz Joseph Haydn, 1732-1809 Meter: 8.7.8.7 D Appears in 542 hymnals Scripture: Psalm 48 Tune Sources: The Hymnal 1982 (Setting) alt. Tune Key: E Flat Major Incipit: 12324 32716 54323 Used With Text: Glorious Things of You Are Spoken

Instances

instance icon
Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals
TextPage scan

Guide Me, O Thou Great Jehovah

Author: William Williams; Peter Williams Hymnal: Hymns of Faith #27 (1980) Scripture: Psalm 48:14 Lyrics: 1 Guide me, O Thou great Jehovah, Pilgrim through this barren land; I am weak, but Thou art mighty; Hold me with Thy pow'rful hand; Bread of heaven, Bread of heaven, Feed me till I want no more, Feed me till I want no more. 2 Open now the crystal fountain, Whence the healing stream doth flow; Let the fire and cloudy pillar Lead me all my journey through: Strong Deliverer, strong Deliverer, Be Thou still my strength and shield, Be Thou still my strength and shield. 3 When I tread the verge of Jordan, Bid my anxious fears subside; Death of death, and hell's destruction, Land me safe on Canaan's side; Songs of praises, songs of praises I will ever give to Thee, I will ever give to Thee. Amen. Topics: Prayer Hymns of; Prayer Hymns of Languages: English Tune Title: [Guide me, O Thou great Jehovah]
TextPage scanAudioFlexscore

Guide Me, O My Great Redeemer

Author: William Williams; Peter Williams Hymnal: Lift Up Your Hearts #43 (2013) Meter: 8.7.8.7.8.7.7 Scripture: Psalm 48:14 Lyrics: 1 Guide me, O my great Redeemer, pilgrim through this barren land; I am weak, but you are mighty; hold me with your powerful hand. Bread of heaven, bread of heaven, feed me now and evermore, feed me now and evermore. 2 Open now the crystal fountain, where the healing waters flow. Let the fire and cloudy pillar lead me all my journey through. Strong Deliverer, strong Deliverer, ever be my strength and shield, ever be my strength and shield. 3 When I tread the verge of Jordan, bid my anxious fears subside. Death of death, and hell's destruction, land me safe on Canaan's side. Songs of praises, songs of praises I will ever sing to you, I will ever sing to you. Topics: Biblical Names and Places Canaan; Biblical Names and Places Jordan River; Biblical Names and Places Pillar of Cloud/Pillar of Fire; Covenant Faithfulness; Powers of Darkness; Death and Dying; Discipleship; Jesus Christ Bread of Life; Jesus Christ Guide; New Heaven and Earth; Occasional Services Funeral/Witness to the Resurrection; Perseverance; Praise of Christ; Praise of God Languages: English Tune Title: CWM RHONDDA
TextPage scanFlexscore

Guide Me, O My Great Redeemer (Oh Pastor divino escucha)

Author: William Williams, 1717-1791; Peter Williams, 1723-1796; William Williams, 1717-1791; Anonymous Hymnal: Santo, Santo, Santo #51 (2019) Meter: 8.7.8.7.8.7.7 Scripture: Psalm 48:14 First Line: Guide me, O my great Redeemer (¡Oh Pastor divino! Escucha) Lyrics: 1 Guide me, O my great Redeemer, Pilgrim through this barren land; I am weak, but you are mighty; Hold me with your pow'rful hand. Bread of heaven, bread of heaven, Feed me now and evermore, Feed me now and evermore. 2 Open now the crystal fountain, Where the healing waters flow. Let the fire and cloudy pillar Lead me all my journey through. Strong Deliv'rer, strong Deliv'rer, Ever be my strength and shield, Ever be my strength and shield. 3 When I tread the verge of Jordan, Bid my anxious fears subside. Death of death, and hell's destruction, Land me safe on Canaan's side. Songs of praises, songs of praises I will ever sing to you, I will ever sing to you. --- 1 ¡Oh Pastor divino! Escucha de tu pueblo el orar; como overjas, congregados, te venimos a buscar. Cristo, llega, Cristo, llega tu rebaño a apacentar, tu rebaño a apacentar. 2 Guía al triste y fatigado al aprisco del Señor. Cría al tierno corderito a tu lado, buen Pastor, con los pastos, con los pastos de celeste y dulce amor, de celeste y dulce amor. 3 ¡Oh Jesús!, escucha el ruego y esta humilde petición! Ven a henchir a tu rebaño de sincera devoción. Cantaremos, cantaremos tu benigna protección, tu benigna protección. Topics: Covenant; Pacto; Guía; Guidance; Oracion; Prayer; Providence; Providencia Languages: English; Spanish Tune Title: CWM RHONDDA

People

person icon
Authors, composers, editors, etc.

Isaac Watts

1674 - 1748 Scripture: Psalm 48:1-8 Author of "Psalm 48 Part 1" in Psalms and Hymns of Isaac Watts, The Isaac Watts was the son of a schoolmaster, and was born in Southampton, July 17, 1674. He is said to have shown remarkable precocity in childhood, beginning the study of Latin, in his fourth year, and writing respectable verses at the age of seven. At the age of sixteen, he went to London to study in the Academy of the Rev. Thomas Rowe, an Independent minister. In 1698, he became assistant minister of the Independent Church, Berry St., London. In 1702, he became pastor. In 1712, he accepted an invitation to visit Sir Thomas Abney, at his residence of Abney Park, and at Sir Thomas' pressing request, made it his home for the remainder of his life. It was a residence most favourable for his health, and for the prosecution of his literary labours. He did not retire from ministerial duties, but preached as often as his delicate health would permit. The number of Watts' publications is very large. His collected works, first published in 1720, embrace sermons, treatises, poems and hymns. His "Horae Lyricae" was published in December, 1705. His "Hymns" appeared in July, 1707. The first hymn he is said to have composed for religious worship, is "Behold the glories of the Lamb," written at the age of twenty. It is as a writer of psalms and hymns that he is everywhere known. Some of his hymns were written to be sung after his sermons, giving expression to the meaning of the text upon which he had preached. Montgomery calls Watts "the greatest name among hymn-writers," and the honour can hardly be disputed. His published hymns number more than eight hundred. Watts died November 25, 1748, and was buried at Bunhill Fields. A monumental statue was erected in Southampton, his native place, and there is also a monument to his memory in the South Choir of Westminster Abbey. "Happy," says the great contemporary champion of Anglican orthodoxy, "will be that reader whose mind is disposed, by his verses or his prose, to imitate him in all but his non-conformity, to copy his benevolence to men, and his reverence to God." ("Memorials of Westminster Abbey," p. 325.) --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872. ================================= Watts, Isaac, D.D. The father of Dr. Watts was a respected Nonconformist, and at the birth of the child, and during its infancy, twice suffered imprisonment for his religious convictions. In his later years he kept a flourishing boarding school at Southampton. Isaac, the eldest of his nine children, was born in that town July 17, 1674. His taste for verse showed itself in early childhood. He was taught Greek, Latin, and Hebrew by Mr. Pinhorn, rector of All Saints, and headmaster of the Grammar School, in Southampton. The splendid promise of the boy induced a physician of the town and other friends to offer him an education at one of the Universities for eventual ordination in the Church of England: but this he refused; and entered a Nonconformist Academy at Stoke Newington in 1690, under the care of Mr. Thomas Rowe, the pastor of the Independent congregation at Girdlers' Hall. Of this congregation he became a member in 1693. Leaving the Academy at the age of twenty, he spent two years at home; and it was then that the bulk of the Hymns and Spiritual Songs (published 1707-9) were written, and sung from manuscripts in the Southampton Chapel. The hymn "Behold the glories of the Lamb" is said to have been the first he composed, and written as an attempt to raise the standard of praise. In answer to requests, others succeeded. The hymn "There is a land of pure delight" is said to have been suggested by the view across Southampton Water. The next six years of Watts's life were again spent at Stoke Newington, in the post of tutor to the son of an eminent Puritan, Sir John Hartopp; and to the intense study of these years must be traced the accumulation of the theological and philosophical materials which he published subsequently, and also the life-long enfeeblement of his constitution. Watts preached his first sermon when he was twenty-four years old. In the next three years he preached frequently; and in 1702 was ordained pastor of the eminent Independent congregation in Mark Lane, over which Caryl and Dr. John Owen had presided, and which numbered Mrs. Bendish, Cromwell's granddaughter, Charles Fleetwood, Charles Desborough, Sir John Hartopp, Lady Haversham, and other distinguished Independents among its members. In this year he removed to the house of Mr. Hollis in the Minories. His health began to fail in the following year, and Mr. Samuel Price was appointed as his assistant in the ministry. In 1712 a fever shattered his constitution, and Mr. Price was then appointed co-pastor of the congregation which had in the meantime removed to a new chapel in Bury Street. It was at this period that he became the guest of Sir Thomas Abney, under whose roof, and after his death (1722) that of his widow, he remained for the rest of his suffering life; residing for the longer portion of these thirty-six years principally at the beautiful country seat of Theobalds in Herts, and for the last thirteen years at Stoke Newington. His degree of D.D. was bestowed on him in 1728, unsolicited, by the University of Edinburgh. His infirmities increased on him up to the peaceful close of his sufferings, Nov. 25, 1748. He was buried in the Puritan restingplace at Bunhill Fields, but a monument was erected to him in Westminster Abbey. His learning and piety, gentleness and largeness of heart have earned him the title of the Melanchthon of his day. Among his friends, churchmen like Bishop Gibson are ranked with Nonconformists such as Doddridge. His theological as well as philosophical fame was considerable. His Speculations on the Human Nature of the Logos, as a contribution to the great controversy on the Holy Trinity, brought on him a charge of Arian opinions. His work on The Improvement of the Mind, published in 1741, is eulogised by Johnson. His Logic was still a valued textbook at Oxford within living memory. The World to Come, published in 1745, was once a favourite devotional work, parts of it being translated into several languages. His Catechisms, Scripture History (1732), as well as The Divine and Moral Songs (1715), were the most popular text-books for religious education fifty years ago. The Hymns and Spiritual Songs were published in 1707-9, though written earlier. The Horae Lyricae, which contains hymns interspersed among the poems, appeared in 1706-9. Some hymns were also appended at the close of the several Sermons preached in London, published in 1721-24. The Psalms were published in 1719. The earliest life of Watts is that by his friend Dr. Gibbons. Johnson has included him in his Lives of the Poets; and Southey has echoed Johnson's warm eulogy. The most interesting modern life is Isaac Watts: his Life and Writings, by E. Paxton Hood. [Rev. H. Leigh Bennett, M.A.] A large mass of Dr. Watts's hymns and paraphrases of the Psalms have no personal history beyond the date of their publication. These we have grouped together here and shall preface the list with the books from which they are taken. (l) Horae Lyricae. Poems chiefly of the Lyric kind. In Three Books Sacred: i.To Devotion and Piety; ii. To Virtue, Honour, and Friendship; iii. To the Memory of the Dead. By I. Watts, 1706. Second edition, 1709. (2) Hymns and Spiritual Songs. In Three Books: i. Collected from the Scriptures; ii. Composed on Divine Subjects; iii. Prepared for the Lord's Supper. By I. Watts, 1707. This contained in Bk i. 78 hymns; Bk. ii. 110; Bk. iii. 22, and 12 doxologies. In the 2nd edition published in 1709, Bk. i. was increased to 150; Bk. ii. to 170; Bk. iii. to 25 and 15 doxologies. (3) Divine and Moral Songs for the Use of Children. By I. Watts, London, 1715. (4) The Psalms of David Imitated in the Language of the New Testament, And apply'd to the Christian State and Worship. By I. Watts. London: Printed by J. Clark, at the Bible and Crown in the Poultry, &c, 1719. (5) Sermons with hymns appended thereto, vol. i., 1721; ii., 1723; iii. 1727. In the 5th ed. of the Sermons the three volumes, in duodecimo, were reduced to two, in octavo. (6) Reliquiae Juveniles: Miscellaneous Thoughts in Prose and Verse, on Natural, Moral, and Divine Subjects; Written chiefly in Younger Years. By I. Watts, D.D., London, 1734. (7) Remnants of Time. London, 1736. 454 Hymns and Versions of the Psalms, in addition to the centos are all in common use at the present time. --Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================================== Watts, I. , p. 1241, ii. Nearly 100 hymns, additional to those already annotated, are given in some minor hymn-books. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ================= Watts, I. , p. 1236, i. At the time of the publication of this Dictionary in 1892, every copy of the 1707 edition of Watts's Hymns and Spiritual Songs was supposed to have perished, and all notes thereon were based upon references which were found in magazines and old collections of hymns and versions of the Psalms. Recently three copies have been recovered, and by a careful examination of one of these we have been able to give some of the results in the revision of pp. 1-1597, and the rest we now subjoin. i. Hymns in the 1709 ed. of Hymns and Spiritual Songs which previously appeared in the 1707 edition of the same book, but are not so noted in the 1st ed. of this Dictionary:— On pp. 1237, L-1239, ii., Nos. 18, 33, 42, 43, 47, 48, 60, 56, 58, 59, 63, 75, 82, 83, 84, 85, 93, 96, 99, 102, 104, 105, 113, 115, 116, 123, 124, 134, 137, 139, 146, 147, 148, 149, 162, 166, 174, 180, 181, 182, 188, 190, 192, 193, 194, 195, 197, 200, 202. ii. Versions of the Psalms in his Psalms of David, 1719, which previously appeared in his Hymns and Spiritual Songs, 1707:— On pp. 1239, U.-1241, i., Nos. 241, 288, 304, 313, 314, 317, 410, 441. iii. Additional not noted in the revision:— 1. My soul, how lovely is the place; p. 1240, ii. 332. This version of Ps. lxiv. first appeared in the 1707 edition of Hymns & Spiritual Songs, as "Ye saints, how lovely is the place." 2. Shine, mighty God, on Britain shine; p. 1055, ii. In the 1707 edition of Hymns & Spiritual Songs, Bk. i., No. 35, and again in his Psalms of David, 1719. 3. Sing to the Lord with [cheerful] joyful voice, p. 1059, ii. This version of Ps. c. is No. 43 in the Hymns & Spiritual Songs, 1707, Bk. i., from which it passed into the Ps. of David, 1719. A careful collation of the earliest editions of Watts's Horae Lyricae shows that Nos. 1, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 16, p. 1237, i., are in the 1706 ed., and that the rest were added in 1709. Of the remaining hymns, Nos. 91 appeared in his Sermons, vol. ii., 1723, and No. 196 in Sermons, vol. i., 1721. No. 199 was added after Watts's death. It must be noted also that the original title of what is usually known as Divine and Moral Songs was Divine Songs only. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907) =========== See also in: Hymn Writers of the Church

William Williams

1717 - 1791 Person Name: William Williams, 1717-1791 Scripture: Psalm 48:14 Author of "Guide Me, O My Great Redeemer" in Psalter Hymnal (Gray) William Williams, called the "Watts of Wales," was born in 1717, at Cefn-y-coed, near Llandovery, Carmarthenshire. He originally studied medicine, but abandoned it for theology. He was ordained Deacon in the Church of England, but was refused Priest's Orders, and subsequently attached himself to the Calvinistic Methodists. For half a century he travelled in Wales, preaching the Gospel. He died in 1791. Williams composed his hymns chiefly in the Welsh language; they are still largely used by various religious bodies in the principality. Many of his hymns have appeared in English, and have been collected and published by Sedgwick. His two principal poetical works are "Hosannah to the Son of David," and "Gloria in Excelsis." --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872. ===================== Williams, William, of Pantycelyn, was the Sweet Singer of Wales. He was born at Cefn-y-Coed, in the Parish of Llanfair-y-bryn, near Llandovery, in 1717. He was ordained a deacon of the Established Church in 1740, by Dr. Claget, Bishop of St. Davids, and for three years he served the Curacies of Llan-wrtyd and Llanddewi-Abergwesyn. He never received Priest's Orders. He became early acquainted with the revivalist Daniel Rowlands, and for thirty-five years he preached once a month at Llanllian and Caio and Llansawel, besides the preaching journeys he took in North and South Wales. He was held in great esteem as a preacher. In 1744 his first book of hymns appeared under the title of Halleluiah, and soon ran through three editions. In1762, he published another book under the title of Y Môr o Wydr, which soon went through five editions. His son John published an excellent edition of his hymns in the year 181lines In addition to his Welsh hymns Williams also published several in English as:— (1.) Hosannah to the Son of David; or, Hymns of Praise to God, For our glorious Redemption by Christ. Some few translated from the Welsh Hymn-Book, but mostly composed on new Subjects. By William Williams. Bristol: Printed by John Grabham, in Narrow-Wine Street, 1759. This contains 51 hymns of which 11 are translated from his Welsh hymns. This little book was reprinted by D. Sedgwick in 1859. (2.) Gloria in Excelsis: or, Hymns of Praise to God and the Lamb. By W. Williams . . . Carmarthen. Printed for the Author by John Ross, removed to Priory Street, near the Church, M.DCC.LXXI. This contains 70 hymns, not including parts. From these volumes the following hymns are in common use:— i. From the Hosannah, 1759:— 1. Jesus, my Saviour is enough. Jesus, All in All. 2. My God, my God, Who art my all. Communion with God desired. 3. The enormous load of human guilt. God's love unspeakable. ii. From the Gloria in Excelsis, 1772. 4. Awake, my soul, and rise. Passiontide. 5. Beneath Thy Cross I lay me down. Passiontide. 6. Hark! the voice of my Beloved. The Voice of Jesus. 7. Jesus, lead us with Thy power. Divine Guidance Desired. Sometimes given as "Father, lead us with Thy power." 8. Jesus, Whose Almighty sceptre. Jesus as King. 9. Saviour, look on Thy beloved. The Help of Jesus desired. 10. White and ruddy is my Beloved. Beauties of Jesus. Williams is most widely known through his two hymns, "Guide me, O Thou great Jehovah," and "O'er those gloomy hills of darkness." Williams died at Pantycelyn, Jan. 11, 1791. [Rev. W. Glanffrwd Thomas] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================= See also in: Hymn Writers of the Church

Peter Williams

1723 - 1796 Scripture: Psalm 48:14 Translator (st. 1) of "Guide Me, O My Great Redeemer" in Psalter Hymnal (Gray) Peter Williams (b. Llansadurnin, Carmarthanshire, Wales, 1722; d. Llandyfeilog, Wales, 1796) was converted to Christianity by the preaching of George Whitefield and was ordained in the Church of England in 1744. His evangelical convictions soon made him suspect, however, and he left the state church to join the Calvinist Methodists in 1746. He served as an itinerant preacher for many years and was a primary figure in the Welsh revival of the eighteenth century. After being expelled by the Methodists in 1791 on a charge of heresy, he ministered in his own chapel during the last years of his life. He published the first Welsh Bible commentary (1767-1770) and a Bible concordance (1773); he was also one of the annotators for John Canne's Welsh Bible (1790). In addition Williams published a Welsh hymnal, Rhai Hymnau ac Odlau Ysbrydol (1759), as well as Hymns on Various Subjects (1771). Bert Polman



Advertisements


It looks like you are using an ad-blocker. Ad revenue helps keep us running. Please consider white-listing Hymnary.org or subscribing to eliminate ads entirely and help support Hymnary.org.