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Andrew Donaldson

b. 1951 Person Name: Andrew Donaldson (b. 1951) Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Alterer of "Go to dark Gethsemane" in Church Hymnary (4th ed.) Andrew Donaldson, a composer and church musician, grew up in northern Ontario, Canada. He attended Glendon College, York University in Toronto, receiving a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1974. He went on to study classical guitar performance at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto, receiving its ARCT (Associate of Royal Conservatory Teachers) degree in 1979. Since then he has worked as a composer and performer in many contexts, in both French and English. Andrew co-edited the Book of Praise (1997), Presbyterian Church in Canada, with Donald Anderson. Their company, Binary Editions, continues to administer copyright for the PCC. In 2007 he was made a Doctor of Divinity, honoris causa, by Knox College of the University of Toronto, for his body of work in congregational song in the Presbyterian Church in Canada. In 2011 Andrew and his wife, Wendy, moved to Geneva, Switzerland where Andrew works as a worship consultant to the World Council of Churches. --Submitted by Andrew and Wendy Donaldson, 13 August 2013

Delores Dufner

b. 1939 Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Author of "Jesus Christ, by Faith Revealed" in One in Faith Delores Dufner is a member of St. Benedict’s Monastery in St. Joseph, Minnesota, with Master's Degrees in Liturgical Music and Liturgical Studies. She is currently a member and a Fellow of The Hymn Society in the United States and Canada, the National Pastoral Musicians (NPM), the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP), and the Monastic Worship Forum. Delores is a writer of liturgical, scripturally based hymn and song texts which have a broad ecumenical appeal and are contracted or licensed by 34 publishers in the United States, Canada, Great Britain, Australia, and China. She has received more than 50 commissions to write texts for special occasions or needs and has published over 200 hymns, many of which have several different musical settings and appear in several publications. She is the author of three hymn collections: Sing a New Church (1994, Oregon Catholic Press), The Glimmer of Glory in Song (2004, GIA Publications), and And Every Breath, a Song (2011, GIA Publications). Delores, the middle child of five, was born and raised on a farm in the Red River Valley of North Dakota. She attended a one-room country school in which she learned to read music and play the tonette, later studying piano and organ. Delores was a school music teacher, private piano and organ instructor, and parish organist/choir director for twelve years. She served as liturgy coordinator for her religious community of 775 members for six years and as Director of the Office of Worship for the Diocese of St. Cloud, Minnesota for fifteen years. She subsequently worked as a liturgical music consultant for the Diocese of Ballarat, Victoria in southeast Australia for fifteen months. At present, she is preparing a fourth hymn collection and assisting with liturgy planning and music leadership at the monastery. Delores Dufner

Thomas Cotterill

1779 - 1823 Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Alterer of "Rock of Ages, Cleft for Me" in Trinity Hymnal (Rev. ed.) Thomas Cotterill (b. Cannock, Staffordshire, England, 1779; d. Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, 1823) studied at St. John's College, Cambridge, England, and became an Anglican clergyman. A central figure in the dispute about the propriety of singing hymns, Cotterill published a popular collection of hymns (including many of his own as well as alterations of other hymns), Selection of Psalms and Hymns in 1810. But when he tried to introduce a later edition of this book in Sheffield in 1819, his congregation protested. Many believed strongly that the Church of England should maintain its tradition of exclusive psalm singing. In a church court the Archbishop of York and Cotterill reached a compromise: the later edition of Selection was withdrawn, and Cotterill was invited to submit a new edition for the archbishop's approval. The new edition was published in 1820 and approved as the first hymnal for the Anglican church of that region. Cotterill's suppressed book, however, set the pattern for Anglican hymnals for the next generation, and many of its hymns are still found in modern hymnals. Bert Polman =============== Thomas Cotterill was born in 1779; studied at S. John's College, Cambridge, graduating M.A.; ordained in 1806, and enterred upon parochial work at Tutbury; afterwards removed to Lane End, where he remained for nine years among the Potteries; in 1817, became perpetual Curate of S. Paul's, Sheffield. He died in 1823. He was the author of several books; among them, "A Selection of Psalms and Hymns for Public and Private Use, adapted to the Services of the Church of England." In the preparation of this collection (the 8th ed., 1819), he had the assistance of Montgomery, who in this work did what he condemned in others, viz., altering and remodeling other authors' hymns. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872. ====================== Cotterill, Thomas, M.A., was the son of a woolstapler at Cannock, Staffordshire, where he was born Dec. 4, 1779. After attending the local boarding-school of the Rev. J. Lomax, he proceeded to the Free School, Birmingham. He graduated at St. John's College, Cambridge (B.A. 1801, M.A. 1805), of which he became a Fellow. Taking Holy Orders, he became Curate of Tutbury in June, 1803 (not 1806, as stated by Miller in Singers & Songs of the Church). His subsequent charges were the Incumbency of Lane End, Staffordshire, 1808-17, and the Perpetual Curacy of St. Paul's Sheffield, 1817-23. He died at Sheffield Dec. 29, 1823 (not Jan. 5, 1824, as in the Gentleman’s Magazine), aged 44. His volume of Family Prayers attained to the sixth edi¬tion in 1824. As a hymn-writer, Cotterill is less known than as the compiler of a Selection of Psalms and Hymns which has had a most marked effect on modern hymnals. The first edition of that Selection was published in 1810, and the 9th in 1820. All subsequent issues were reprints of the last. The most important edition is the 8th, 1819. To that Selection Cotterill contributed at various dates 25 original hymns and versions of individual psalms. These, in common with all the hymns in the Selection, are given without author's name. Through the aid, however, of marked copies [in the collections of Brooke and Julian] and of members of Cotterill's family, we are enabled to identify most, if not all, of his original productions. In addition to those which are annotated under their first lines, we have— i. In his Selection of Psalms & Hymns for Public and Private Use, adapted to the Festivals of the Church of England, &c, 1st ed., 1810:— 1. Awake, O sword, the Father cried. Atonement. 2. Before Thy throne of grace, O Lord. Lent. 3. From Sinai's mount, in might array'd. The Law and the Gospel. 4. From Thine all-seeing Spirit, Lord. Ps. 139. 5. In all the ways and works of God. Ps. 145. 6. Out of the deeps, O Lord, we call. Ps. 130. 7. The Lord, who once on Calvary. The Intercessor. This is based on “Where high the heavenly temple stands," q. v. ii. In the Appendix to the 6th ed. of the same Selection, Staffordshire, 1815:— 8. Blessed are they who mourn for sin. Lent. 9. Father of mercies, let our songs [way, ways]. Thanksgiving. 10. I was alive without the law. Lent. 11. Lord of the Sabbath, 'tis Thy day. Sunday. iii. In the 8th edition of the same, 1819 :— 12. Help us, O Lord, Thy yoke to wear. Charity Sermons. This is sometimes given as "Lord, let us learn Thy yoke to wear," as in Kennedy, 1863, &c. 13. I love the Lord, for He hath heard. Ps. 116. 14. Lo in the East a star appears. Epiphany. This in an altered form begins in Kennedy, 1863, No. 188, with stanza ii., "The ancient sages from afar." 15. Lord, cause Thy face on us to shine. For Unity. 16. When Christ, victorious from the grave. Easter. The 9th ed. of the Selection, 1820, was practically a new work. It was compiled by Cotterill, but revised by Dr. Harcourt, the Archbishop of York, and was dedi¬cated to him. It was the outcome of the compromise in the legal proceedings over the 8th ed., 1819. The 8th ed. contained 367 hymns in addition to 128 versions of the Psalms and 6 Doxologies, the 9th only 152. Its full title was A Selection of Psalms and Hymns for Public Worship, Lond., T. Cadell, 1820. It may be noted that copies of the 8th ed., 1819, are found with two distinct title-pages. One of these, accompanied with the preface, was for the general public, the second, without the preface, for the use of the congregations of St. James's and St. Paul's, Sheffield. Of Cotterill's hymns the most popular are, "O'er the realms of pagan darkness," "Let songs of praises fill the sky," and "Jesus exalted far on high," but these are not distinguished by any striking features of excellence. He was more happy in some of his alterations of older hymns, and in the com¬piling of centos. Many of the readings introduced into the great hymns of the Church first appeared in his Selection. The most notable amongst these are, "Rock of Ages," in 3 stanzas, as in Hymns Ancient & Modern, 1861, the Wesleyan Hymn Book, and other collections; "Lo! He comes with clouds descending;" and “Great God, what do I see and hear." Cotterill's connection with the Uttoxeter Psalms & Hymns, 1805, is given in detail in the article on Staffordshire Hymn-books, and his lawsuit over the 8th ed. of his Selection, 1819, in the article on England Hymnody, Church of. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Freiherr Christian Knorr von Rosenroth

1636 - 1689 Person Name: Christian Knorr, Baron von Rosenroth Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Author of "Jesus, Sun of Righteousness" in Christian Youth Hymnal Knorr, Christian, Baron von Rosenroth, son of Abraham Knorr yon Rosenroth, pastor at Altrauden in Silesia, was born at Altrauden, July 15, 1636. After studying at the Universities of Leipzig (where he graduated M.A. 1659, along with J. B. Carpzov, the famous Orientalist) and Wittenberg, he made an extended tour through France, England, and Holland. At Amsterdam he became acquainted with an Armenian prince, with the chief Rabbi, Meier Stern, from Frankfurt-am-Main, with Dr. John Lightfoot, Dr. Henry More, and others, and as the result of intercourse with them, devoted himself to the study of the Oriental languages, of chemistry, and of the cabalistic sciences. For his learning in these departments he was taken into the service of the like-minded Palsgrave Christian August of Sulzbach, who in 1668 appointed him Geheimrath and prime minister (Kanzlei-director). He was created Baron von Rosenroth by the Emperor Leopold I. in 1677, and died at Sulzbach (near Amberg, Bavaria), May 8, 1689, it is said at the hour he had himself predicted. (Wetzel, ii. 43, and A. H., ii. 444; Hömer's Nachrichten von Liederdichtern, Schwabach, 1775, p. 142, &c.) Knorr edited various Rabbinical writings, published various cabalistic works (e.g. his Kabbala denudata, 2 vols., Sulzbach, 1677), and was one of the seekers after the philosopher's stone. His hymns appeared as Neuer Helicon mit seiner Neun Musen, das ist: Geistliche Sitten-Lieder, &c. Nurnberg, 1684 [Hamburg Library], a work containing 70 hymns mostly flowing in expression and metre. Of these 12 are poetic versions from Boethius's De Consolatione Philosophiae, 8 are from Latin hymns, and 8 are recasts of older German hymns. Sixteen of his hymns were included by Freylinghausen in his Gesang-Buch, 1704 and 1714. Koch speaks of them not unjustly as "truly pious and spiritual," as "of genuine poetical elevation and glowing desire after inner union with Christ," and as the fruits of a "noble and chastely earnest mysticism." Two of Knorr's hymns have passed into English. One is a translation of "Ad coenam Agni" (p. 12 ii.). The other is Morgenglanz der Ewigkeit. Morning. This fine hymn appeared, 1684, as above, p. 159, in 7 st. of 6 1., entitled " Morning Prayer," and is included in the Berlin G. L. 8., ed. 1863, No. 1121. It is based on a hymn by M. Opitz, but is more happily expressed, and has attained much greater popularity. Fischer, ii. 94, speaks of it as "one of the freshest, most original, and spirited of Morning Hymns, as if born from the dew of the sunrise." In all the translations in common use, st. ii., v. are omitted. Translated as:— 1. Light of heaven's eternal day! A good translation by A. T. Russell, as No. 68 in the Dalston Hospital Hymn Book, 1848, repeated in his own Psalms & Hymns, 1851, and the Cheltenham College Hymn Book, 1866. 2. Dayspring of Eternity! Dawn on us this morning-tide. A good translation by Miss Winkworth in her Lyra Germanica, 1st Ser., 1855, p. 219. In full in the Hymnal for St. John's, Aberdeen, 1870, and E. Courtauld's Psalms, Hymns & Anthems, 1860; and abridged in Hymns of the Spirit Boston, U. S., 1864, Dr. Martineau's Hymns, 1873, and others. 3. Jesus, Sun of Righteousness. A good but rather free translation by Miss Borthwick, in Hymns from the Land of Luther, 2nd Ser., 1855, p. 23 (1884, p. 88), included in the Hymnal Companion, 1876; Evangelical Union Hymnal, 1878; Church Praise, 1883, &c.; and in America in the Sabbath Hymn Book, 1858; Pennsylvania Lutheran Church Book, 1868, and others. In E. T. Prust's Supplemental Hymn Book, 1869, Baptist Hymnal, 1879, and others, 1 l. 5, 6 of each st. are omitted. In Hatfield's Church Hymn Book, N. Y., 1872, Hymns & Songs of Praise, N. Y., 1874, and others, it is rewritten to 6 lines of 7's. 4. Come, Thou bright And morning star. A good translation contributed by R. Massie to the 1857 ed. of Mercer's The Church Psalter & Hymnbook., No. 502 (Ox. ed. 1864, No. 1), and in his own Lyra Domestica, 18&4, p. 136. Repeated in R. Minton Taylor's Hymnal, 1872, No. 42; Marlborough College Hymn Book, 1869 ; Rugby School Hymn Book, 1876, and others. 5. Sun of heaven's eternal day. A good translation contributed by Dr. John Ker to the United Presbyterian Juvenile Mission Magazine, 1858, p. 73; repeated in the Ibrox Hymnal 1871. 6. Dayspring of Eternity, Light of uncreated tight. By Dr. B. H. Kennedy, as No. 824 in his Hymnologia Christiana, 1863. 7. Dayspring of Eternity! Hide no more thy radiant dawning. A good translation by Miss Winkworth (based on her 1855 version), as No. 159 in her Chorale Book for England, 1863. Repeated in R. Minton Taylor's Hymnal, 1872, No. 43, and the Book of Church Praise, 1865 (Bosworth). 8. Dayspring of Eternity, Brightness of the Father's glory. A good but free translation by J. H. Hopkins, first published in Dr. Walter's Chorals & Hymns, 1866, and then in his own Carols, Hymns & Songs, 1882, p. 145. Included in the Hymns & Songs of Praise, N. Y., 1874. 9. Dayspring of Eternity, Brightness of the Light divine. In Brown-Borthwick's Select Hymns, 1871, and Church Hymns, 1871, compiled mainly from the translations by Miss Winkworth an« Miss Borthwick, but partly from Dr. Kennedy and Mr. Russell. Thence in J. L. Porter's Collection, 1876, and the Psalmist, 1878. 10. Dayspring of eternal day. A good translation by Edward Thring, contributed to the Uppingham and Sherborne School Hymn Book, 1874, No. 5. Other trs. are: (1) "Day-dawn of Eternity," by H. J. Buckoll, 1842, p. 35. (2) "Daystar from Eternity," in J. Sheppard's Foreign Sacred Lyre, 1857, p. 84. (3) and Reid's Praise Book, 1812, No. 404. [Rev. J. Mearns, M.A.] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ===================== Knorr, Christian, Baron von Rosenroth, p. 620, i. E. Thring's translation of "Morgenglanz der Ewigkeit" (p. 630, i. 10), is altered in the Sherborne School Hymn Book, 1888, to "Day spring of Eternity, Light from depths of light unending." --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

George Paul Simmonds

1890 - 1991 Person Name: George P. Simmonds Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Author of "En tu templo, Padre Dios" in El Himnario See also J. Pablo Simón. =========== At four years, George sang hymns with great devotion and enthusiasm. When he was ten he felt called to be a missionary. He retained his love for the Lord and for music throughout his life. So much so, that after the age of one hundred years old even sang solos in large meetings and on television. He began his work as a missionary, along with his wife, Nessie, in Ecuador. Then explored the Amazon area and across the continent. Collaborated in the compilation of "Hymns of the Christian Life." He also worked with the Bible Societies in several South American countries. He then served as pastor of a Hispanic church in the United States of America. He was a prolific translator of 800 hymns and choral songs. He used some pseudonyms as G. Paul S. and J. Paul Simon. --p5p5.cl.tripod.com/CuartetoPlenitud/historia_himnos =========== In 1964 he edited El Himnario which was to become the most widely used Protestant Hispanic hymnbook of this century. Throughout his ministry and particularly in his later years, Simmonds dedicated himself to bring Hispanic hymnody into the Anglo church through his publishing company, Cánticos Escogidos, first based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and later in Duarte, California. The Presbyerian Hymnal Companion, 1993

Federico J. Pagura

1923 - 2016 Person Name: Federico J. Pagura, b. 1923 Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Translator of "For the Beauty of the Earth (Por la Excelsa Majestad)" in Oramos Cantando = We Pray In Song Federico José Pagura was an Argentine Methodist bishop and author and translator of hymns. Leland Bryant Ross

Fanny Crosby

1820 - 1915 Person Name: Fanny Crosby Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Author of "The Land To Which We Go" in The Cyber Hymnal Pseudonymns: A.V., Mrs. A. E. Andrews, Mrs. E. A. Andrews, Mrs. E. L. Andrews, James L. Black, Henrietta E. Blair, Charles Bruce, Robert Bruce, Leah Carlton, Eleanor Craddock, Lyman G. Cuyler, D.H.W., Ella Dare, Ellen Dare, Mrs. Ellen Douglass, Lizzie Edwards. Miss Grace Elliot, Grace J. Frances, Victoria Frances, Jennie Garnett, Frank Gould, H. D. K., Frances Hope, Annie L. James, Martha J. Lankton [Langton], Grace Lindsey, Maud Marion, Sallie Martin, Wilson Meade, Alice Monteith, Martha C. Oliver, Mrs. N. D. Plume, Kate Smiley, Sallie Smith, J. L. Sterling, John Sterling, Julia Sterling, Anna C. Storey, Victoria Stuart, Ida Scott Taylor, Mary R. Tilden, Mrs. J. B. Thresher, Hope Tryaway, Grace Tureman, Carrie M. Wilson, W.H.D. Frances Jane Crosby, the daughter of John and Mercy Crosby, was born in Southeast, Putnam County, N. Y., March 24, 1820. She became blind at the age of six weeks from maltreatment of her eyes during a spell of sickness. When she was eight years old she moved with her parents to Ridgefield, Conn., the family remaining there four years. At the age of fifteen she entered the New York Institution for the Blind, where she received a good education. She became a teacher in the institution in 1847, and continued her work until March 1, 1858. She taught English grammar, rhetoric and American history. This was the great developing period in her life. During the vacations of 1852 and 1853, spent at North Reading, Mass., she wrote the words to many songs for Dr. Geo. F. Root, then the teacher of music at the blind institution. Among them were, "Hazel Dell,", "The Honeysuckle Glen," "Rosalie, the Prairie Flower," "Music in the Air," "Proud World, Good-bye, I'm Going Home," "All Together", "Never Forget the Dear Ones," and others. Subsequently she wrote the words for the cantatas of The Flower Queen and The Pilgrim Fathers, all of which were very popular in their day, though it was not generally known at the time that she was the author. While teaching at the institution she met Presidents Van Buren and Tyler, Hon. Henry Clay, Governor Wm. H. Seward, General Winfield Scott, and other distinguished characters of American history. Concerning Mr. Clay, she gives the following: "When Mr. Clay came to the institution during his last visit to New York, I was selected to welcome him with a poem. Six months before he had lost a son at the battle of Monterey, and I had sent him some verses. In my address I carefully avoided any allusion to them, in order not to wound him. When I had finished he drew my arm in his, and, addressing the audience, said through his tears: 'This is not the first poem for which I am indebted to this lady. Six months ago she sent me some lines on the death of my dear son.' Both of us were overcome for a few moments. Soon, by a splendid effort, Mr. Clay recovered himself, but I could not control my tears." In connection with her meeting these notable men, we might add that Miss Fanny Crosby had the honor of being the first woman whose voice was heard publicly in the Senate Chamber at Washington. She read a poem there on one occasion. In addition to the thousands of hymns that she has written (about eight thousand poems in all), many of which have not been set to music, she has published four volumes of verses. The first was issued in 1844 and was entitled The Blind Girl, and Other Poems, a second volume, Monterey, and Other Poems, followed in 1849, and the third, A Wreath of Columbia's Flowers, in 1858. The fourth, Bells at Evening and Other Verses, with a biographical sketch by Rev. Robert Lowry, and a fine half-tone portrait, in 1897, the sales of which have reached a fourth edition. The book is published by The Biglow & Main Co., New York. Though these show the poetical bent of her mind, they have little to do with her world-wide fame. It is as a writer of Sunday-school songs and gospel hymns that she is known wherever the English language is spoken, and, in fact, wherever any other language is heard. Fanny was married March 5, 1858, to Alex. Van Alstyne, who was also a scholar in the same institution in which she was educated. She began to write Sunday-school hymns for Wm. B. Bradbury in 1864. Her first hymn, "We are going, we are going To a home beyond the skies", was written at the Ponton Hotel on Franklin Street, New York City, on February 5th of that year. This hymn was sung at Mr. Bradbury's funeral in January, 1868. Since 1864 she supported herself by writing hymns. She resided in New York City nearly all her life, where, she says, she is "a member of the Old John Street M. E. Church in good standing." She spent regular hours on certain days at the office of The Biglow & Main Co., the firm for which she did most of her writing, and for whom she has composed over four thousand hymns. Her hymns have been in great demand and have been used by many of our most popular composers, among whom may be mentioned Wm. B. Bradbury, Geo. F. Root, W. H. Doane, Rev. Robert Lowry, Ira D. Sankey, J. R. Sweney, W. J. Kirkpatrick, H. P. Main, H. P. Danks, Philip Phillips, B. G. Unseld, and others. She could compose at any time and did not need to wait for any special inspiration, and her best hymns have come on the spur of the moment. She always composed with an open book in her hand, generally a copy of Golden Hymns, held closely over her eyes, bottom side up. She learned to play on the guitar and piano while at the institution, and has a clear soprano voice. She also received a technical training in music, and for this reason she could, and did, compose airs for some of her hymns. One of these is, "Jesus, dear, I come to Thee, Thou hast said I may," both words and music of which are wonderfully sweet. "Safe in the arms of Jesus", probably one of her best known hymns, was her own favorite. Fanny loved her work, and was happy in it. She was always ready either to sympathize or join in a mirthful conversation, as the case may be. The secret of this contentment dates from her first composition at the age of eight years. "It has been the motto of my life," she says. It is: "O what a happy soul am I! Although I cannot see, I am resolved that in this world Contented I will be;" This has continued to be her philosophy. She says that had it not been for her affliction she might not have so good an education, nor so great an influence, and certainly not so fine a memory. She knows a great many portions of the Bible by heart, and had committed to memory the first four books of the Old Testament, and also the four Gospels before she was ten years of age. Her scope of subjects is wide, embracing everything from a contemplation of heaven, as in "The Bright Forever" and "The Blessed Homeland", to an appeal to the work of this world, as in "To the Work" and "Rescue the Perishing." The most of Fanny's published hymns have appeared under the name of Fanny J. Crosby or Mrs. Yan Alstyne, but quite a large number have appeared under the nom de plumes of Grace J. Frances, Mrs. C. M. Wilson, Lizzie Edwards, Ella Dale, Henrietta E. Blair, Rose Atherton, Maud Marion, Leah Carlton, nearly two hundred different names. -Biographies of Gospel Song and Hymn Writers (excerpts) ======================= Van Alstyne, Frances Jane, née Crosby, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, was born at South East, Putnam County, New York, March 24, 1823. When six weeks old she lost her sight. About 1835 she entered the New York City Institution for the Blind. On completing her training she became a teacher therein from 1847 to 1858. In 1858 she was married to Alexander Van Alstyne, a musician, who was also blind. Her first poem was published in 1831; and her first volumes of verse as A Blind Girl, and Other Poems, 1844; Monteresy, and Other Poems, 1849; and A Wreath of Columbia's Flowers, 1858. Her first hymn was "We are going, we are going" (Death and Burial), which was written for Mr. Bradbury and published in the Golden Censer, 1864. From 1853 to 1858 she wrote 20 songs, which were set to music by G. F. Root. Her songs and hymns number some 2,000 or more, and have been published mainly in several of the popular American Sunday school collections, and often under a nom de plume. About 60 have come into common use in Great Britain. The majority of these are taken from the following American collections:— i. From The Shining Star, 1864. 1. Softly on the breath of evening. Evening. ii. From Fresh Laurels, 1867. 2. Beautiful Mansions, home of the blest. Heaven. 3. Jesus the Water of Life has given. The Water of Life. 4. Light and Comfort of my soul. In Affliction. 5. There's a cry from Macedonia. Missions. 6. We are marching on with shield and banner bright. Sunday School Anniversary. iii. From Musical Leaves, 1868. 7. 0 what are you going to do, brother? Youth for God. iv. From Sabbath Carols, 1868. 8. Dark is the night, and cold the wind is blowing. Affliction anticipated. 9. Lord, at Thy mercy seat, Humbly I fall. Lent. v. From Silver Spray, 1868. 10. If I come to Jesus, He will make me glad. Peace in Jesus. 11. 'Twill not be long—our journey here. Heaven anticipated. vi. From Notes of Joy, 1869. 12. Little beams of rosy light. The Divine Father. 13. Press on! press on! a glorious throng. Pressing towards the Prize. vii. From Bright Jewels, 1869. 14. Christ the Lord is risen today, He is risen indeed. Easter. 15. Holy, holy, holy is the Lord! Sing 0 ye people, &c. Holiness of God. 16. Jesus, keep me near the Cross. Near the Cross of Christ. 17. Saviour, bless a little child. A Child's Prayer. Written Feb. 6, 1869. viii. From Songs of Devotion, 1870. 18. Pass me not, 0 gentle Saviour. Lent. Written in 1868. 19. Rescue the perishing, care for the dying. Home Missions. ix. From Pure Gold, 1871. 20. Great is Jehovah. King of kings. Greatness of God. 21. I would be Thy little lamb. The Good Shepherd. 22. Lead me to Jesus, lead me to Jesus. Desiring Jesus. 23. To the work, to the work, we are servants of God. Home Missions. 24. Why labour for treasures that rust and decay? The Fadeless Crown. x. From the Royal Diadem, 1873. 25. I am Jesus' little friend. For Infant Schools. 26. Jesus I love Thee. Loving Jesus. 27. Mourner, wheresoe'er thou art. To the Sorrowing and Penitent. Written Oct. 3, 1871. 28. Never be faint or weary. Joy in Jesus. 29. Only a step to Jesus. Invitation. xi. From Winnowed Hymns, 1873-4. 30. Loving Saviour, hear my cry. Lent. xii. From Echoes of Zion, 1874. 31. Say, where is thy refuge, my brother? Home Missions. xiii. From Songs of Grace and Glory, 1874. 32. Thou my everlasting Portion. Christ the Portion of His People. xiv. From Brightest and Best, 1875. 33. All the way my Saviour leads me. Jesus the Guide. 34. I am Thine, O Lord: I have heard Thy voice. Holiness desired. 35. O come to the Saviour, believe in His name. Invitation. Written, Sep. 7, 1874. 36. O how sweet when we mingle. Communion of Saints. Written in 1866. 37. O my Saviour, hear me. Prayer to Jesus for blessing and love. 38. Only Jesus feels and knows. Jesus the Divine Friend. 39. Revive Thy work, O Lord. Home Missions. 40. Saviour, more than life to me. Jesus All and in All. 41. To God be the glory, great things He hath done. Praise for Redemption. xv. From Calvary Songs, 1875. 42. Come, O come with thy broken heart. Invitation. xvi. From Gospel Music, 1876. 43. Here from the world we turn. Divine Worship. 44. When Jesus comes to reward His servants. Watching, xvii. From Welcome Tidings, 1877. 45. O hear my cry, be gracious now to me. For Pardon and Peace. xviii. From The Fountain of Song, 1877. 46. Lord, my trust I repose on Thee. Trusting in Jesus. xix. From Good as Gold, 1880. 47. In Thy cleft, O Rock of Ages. Safety in Jesus. 48. Sound the alarm ! let the watchman cry. Home Missions. 49. Tenderly He leads us. Christ the Leader. 50. 'Tis the blessed hour of prayer. The Hour of Prayer. In addition to these hymns, all of which are in common use in Great Britain (mainly through I. D. Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos, the Methodist Sunday School Hymn Book, the Silver Street Sunday Scholars Companion, and other collections for Sunday schools), there are also "A blessing for you, will you take it?" (Pardon through Jesus); "My song shall be of Jesus" (Praise of Jesus); “Now, just a word for Jesus"(Home Missions); "Onward, upward, Christian soldier" (Pressing Heavenward); 44 Sinner, how thy heart is troubled" (Invitation); "'Tis a goodly, pleasant land" (Heaven anticipated); and "When the dewy light was fading" (Death anticipated). All of these are in I. D. Sankey's Sacred Songs & Solos. Mrs. Van Alstyne's most popular composition is "Safe in the arms of Jesus" (Safety in Jesus). This was written in 1868, at the request of Mr. W. H. Doane, to his well-known melody with which it is inseparably associated, and published in Bright Jewels, 1869. Mrs. Van Alstyne's hymns have sometimes been published anonymously; but the greater part are signed by a bewildering number of initials. The combined sales of the volumes of songs and hymns named above have amounted in English-speaking countries to millions of copies. Notwithstanding the immense circulation thus given to Mrs. Van Alstyne's hymns, they are, with few exceptions, very weak and poor, their simplicity and earnestness being their redeeming features. Their popularity is largely due to the melodies to which they are wedded. Since the above was in type we have found that the following are also in common use in Great Britain:— 51. Suppose the little cowslip. Value of Little Things. 52. Sweet hour of prayer. The Hour of Prayer. These are in Bradbury's Golden Chain, 1861. 53. Never lose the golden rule. Love to our Neighbours. In Bradbury's Golden Censer, 1864. 54. I will not be afraid at night. Trust in God. In Bradbury's Fresh Laurels, 1867. 55. Praise Him, praise Him, Jesus our, &c. Praise of Jesus. In Biglow & Main's Bright Jewels, 1869. 56. More like Jesus would I be. More like Jesus. In Perkins & Taylor's Songs of Salvation, 1870. 57. Behold me standing at the door. Christ at the Door. In Biglow & Main's Christian Songs, 1872. 58. If I come to Jesus. Jesus the Children's Guide. 59. Jesus, Lord, I come to Thee. Trust in Jesus. 60. Let me learn of Jesus. Jesus the Children's Friend. 61. Singing for Jesus, O singing for Jesus. Singing for Jesus. 62. There is a Name divinely sweet Holy Name of Jesus. Of these hymns Nos. 58-62 we have not been able to trace. --Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907 ================ Van Alstyne, Frances J., p. 1203, ii. From the American collections of recent date we find that Mrs. Van Alstyne is still actively engaged in hymn-writing. In the Funk and Wagnalls Company Gloria Deo, 1903, there are about 30 of her hymns, most of which are new. They are all signed, and some are dated, but we have not space to quote the first lines and subjects, as this hymnal is not an official collection of any denomination. Another name, "Mrs. S. K. Bourne" is credited in the same hymnal with about 40 new hymns. If this signature is not another pen-name of Mrs. Van Alstyne's (and these pen-names and initials of hers are very numerous), we can only say that she has a very successful understudy in "Mrs. S. K. Bourne." --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

William F. Sherwin

1826 - 1888 Person Name: William Fiske Sherwin Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Composer of "BETTER LAND" in The Cyber Hymnal Sherwin, William Fisk, an American Baptist, was born at Buckland, Massachusetts, March 14,1826. His educational opportunities, so far as schools were concerned, were few, but he made excellent use of his time and surroundings. At fifteen he went to Boston and studied music under Dr. Mason: In due course he became a teacher of vocal music, and held several important appointments in Massachusetts; in Hudson and Albany, New York County, and then in New York City. Taking special interest in Sunday Schools, he composed carols and hymn-tunes largely for their use, and was associated with the Rev. R. Lowry and others in preparing Bright Jewels, and other popular Sunday School hymn and tune books. A few of his melodies are known in Great Britain through I. D. Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos, where they are given with his signature. His hymnwriting was limited. The following pieces are in common use:— 1. Grander than ocean's story (1871). The Love of God. 2. Hark, bark, the merry Christmas bells. Christmas Carol. 3. Lo, the day of God is breaking. The Spiritual Warfare. 4. Wake the song of joy and gladness. Sunday School or Temperance Anniversary. 5. Why is thy faith, 0 Child of God, so small. Safety in Jesus. Mr. Sherwin died at Boston, Massachusetts, April 14, 1888. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================== Sherwin, W. F., p. 1055, i. Another hymn from his Bright Jewels, 1869, p. 68, is "Sound the battle cry" (Christian Courage), in the Sunday School Hymnary, 1905, and several other collections. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Brian A. Wren

b. 1936 Person Name: Brian Wren, 1936- Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Author of "Holy Spirit, Storm of Love" in Common Praise (1998) Brian Wren (b. Romford, Essex, England, 1936) is a major British figure in the revival of contemporary hymn writing. He studied French literature at New College and theology at Mansfield College in Oxford, England. Ordained in 1965, he was pastor of the Congregational Church (now United Reformed) in Hockley and Hawkwell, Essex, from 1965 to 1970. He worked for the British Council of Churches and several other organizations involved in fighting poverty and promoting peace and justice. This work resulted in his writing of Education for Justice (1977) and Patriotism and Peace (1983). With a ministry throughout the English-speaking world, Wren now resides in the United States where he is active as a freelance lecturer, preacher, and full-time hymn writer. His hymn texts are published in Faith Looking Forward (1983), Praising a Mystery (1986), Bring Many Names (1989), New Beginnings (1993), and Faith Renewed: 33 Hymns Reissued and Revised (1995), as well as in many modern hymnals. He has also produced What Language Shall I Borrow? (1989), a discussion guide to inclusive language in Christian worship. Bert Polman

Martin Madan

1726 - 1790 Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Composer of "HOTHAM" Madan, Martin, son of Colonel Martin Madan, and brother of Dr. Spencer Madan, sometime Bishop of Peterborough, was born in 1726. He was to have qualified for the Bar, but through a sermon by J. Wesley on the words "Prepare to meet thy God," the whole current of his life was changed. After some difficulty he received Holy Orders, and subsequently founded and became chaplain of the Lock Hospital, Hyde Park Corner. He was popular as a preacher, and had no inconsiderable reputation as a musical composer. He ceased preaching on the publication of his work Thelyphthora, in which he advocated the practice of polygamy. He died in 1790. He published A Commentary on the Articles of the Church of England; A Treatise on the Christian Faith, &c, and:— A Collection of Psalms and Hymns Extracted from Various Authors, and published by the Reverend Mr. Madan. London, 1760. This Collection contained 170 hymns thrown together without order or system of any kind. In 1763 he added an Appendix of 24 hymns. This Collection, referred to as Madam’s Psalms & Hymns, had for many years a most powerful influence on the hymnody of the Church of England. Nearly the whole of its contents, together with its extensively altered texts, were reprinted in numerous hymnbooks for nearly one hundred years. At the present time many of the great hymns of the last century are in use as altered by him in 1760 and 1763. Although several hymns have been attributed to him, we have no evidence that he ever wrote one. His hymnological labours were employed in altering, piecing, and expanding the work of others. And in this he was most successful. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ============================

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