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Joseph Barnby

1838 - 1896 Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Composer of "DIDSBURY" Joseph Barnby (b. York, England, 1838; d. London, England, 1896) An accomplished and popular choral director in England, Barby showed his musical genius early: he was an organist and choirmaster at the age of twelve. He became organist at St. Andrews, Wells Street, London, where he developed an outstanding choral program (at times nicknamed "the Sunday Opera"). Barnby introduced annual performances of J. S. Bach's St. John Passion in St. Anne's, Soho, and directed the first performance in an English church of the St. Matthew Passion. He was also active in regional music festivals, conducted the Royal Choral Society, and composed and edited music (mainly for Novello and Company). In 1892 he was knighted by Queen Victoria. His compositions include many anthems and service music for the Anglican liturgy, as well as 246 hymn tunes (published posthumously in 1897). He edited four hymnals, including The Hymnary (1872) and The Congregational Sunday School Hymnal (1891), and coedited The Cathedral Psalter (1873). Bert Polman

John Stainer

1840 - 1901 Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Composer of "CELANO (Stainer)"

Arthur Henry Brown

1830 - 1926 Person Name: A. H. Brown Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Composer of "ST. ULRIC" in The Church Hymnal Born: Ju­ly 24, 1830, Brent­wood, Es­sex, Eng­land. Died: Feb­ru­a­ry 15, 1926, Brent­wood, Es­sex, Eng­land. Almost com­plete­ly self taught, Brown be­gan play­ing the or­gan at the age 10. He was or­gan­ist of the Brent­wood Par­ish Church, Es­sex (1842-53); St. Ed­ward’s, Rom­ford (1853-58); Brent­wood Par­ish Church (1858-88); St. Pe­ter’s Church, South Weald (from 1889); and Sir An­tho­ny Browne’s School (to 1926). A mem­ber of the Lon­don Gre­gor­i­an As­so­ci­a­tion, he helped as­sem­ble the Ser­vice Book for the an­nu­al fes­tiv­al in St. Paul’s Ca­thed­ral. He sup­port­ed the Ox­ford Move­ment, and pi­o­neered the res­tor­a­tion of plain­chant and Gre­gor­i­an mu­sic in Ang­li­can wor­ship. Brown ed­it­ed var­i­ous pub­li­ca­tions, in­clud­ing the Al­tar Hym­nal. His other works in­clude set­tings of the Can­ti­cles and the Ho­ly Com­mun­ion Ser­vice, a Child­ren’s Fes­tiv­al Serv­ice, an­thems, songs, part songs, and over 800 hymn tunes and car­ols. Music: Alleluia! Sing the Tri­umph Arthur Dale Ab­bey Fields of Gold Are Glow­ing Gerran Holy Church Holy Rood If An­gels Sang Our Sav­ior’s Birth Lammas O, Sing We a Car­ol Purleigh Redemptor Mun­di Ring On, Ye Joy­ous Christ­mas Bells Saffron Wal­den St. An­a­tol­i­us St. Aus­tell St. John Dam­as­cene St. Ma­byn St. So­phro­ni­us Story of the Cross Sweet Child Di­vine --www.hymntime.com/tch

Johann C. Schwedler

1672 - 1730 Person Name: Johann C Schwedler, 1672-1730 Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Author of "Ask Ye What Great Thing I Know" in The A.M.E. Zion Hymnal Schwedler, Johann Christoph, son of Anton Schwedler, farmer and rural magistrate at Krobsdorf, near Lowenberg, in Silesia, was born at Krobsdorf, Dec. 21, 1672, and matriculated at the University of Leipzig, in 1695 (M.A. 1697). In 1698 he was appointed assistant minister at Niederwiese, near Greiffenberg, and began his duties there on the 18th Sunday after Trinity. On the death of the diaconus, Christoph Adolph, he succeeded him as diaconus, in December, 1698; and, finally, in 1701, he became pastor there. He died at Niederwiese, suddenly, during the night of Jan. 12, 1730. Schwedler was a powerful and popular preacher, and peculiarly gifted in prayer. It is said that sometimes, beginning service at 5 or 6 a.m., he would continue the service to relays who in succession filled the church, till 2 or 3 p.m. He also founded an orphanage at Niederwiese. He was a near neighbour and great friend of Johann Mentzer and N. L. von Zinzendorf. As a hymnwriter he was useful and popular. The principal theme of his hymns was the Grace of God through Christ, and the joyful confidence imparted to the soul that experienced it. Of his hymns, 462 appeared in his Die Lieder Mose und des Lammes, oder neu eingerichtetes Gesang-Buch, Budissin, 1720, Nos. 345-806. Others are in his Wöchentliche Hauss-Andacht, 1112, in his various devotional works, and in the hymn-books of the period. The only hymn by Schwedler translated into English is:— Wollt ihr wissen was mein Preis? Jesus the Crucified, or Love to Christ. Founded on 1 Cor. ii. 2, and Gal. vi. 14. The trs. in common use are:— 1. Ask ye what great thing I know. By Dr. Kennedy, in his Hymnologia Christiana, 1863, No. 620, being a good tr. of st. i.-v., with a sixth stanza suggested by st. vi. of the German. 2. Do you ask what most I prize? This is a fairly close version, omitting st. vi., as No. 98, in the Moravian Hymn Book, 1886. [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] --Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Ludvig Mathias Lindeman

1812 - 1887 Person Name: L. M. Lindeman, 1812-87 Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Composer of "FRED TIL BOD" in Evangelical Lutheran Hymnary Ludvig M. Lindeman (b. 1812; d. 1887) was a Norwegian composer and organist. Born in Trondheim, he studied theology in Oslo where he remained the rest of his life. In 1839 he succeeded his brother as the organist and cantor of Oslo Cathedral, a position he held for 48 years up until his death. Lindeman was appointed Knight of the Royal Norwegian Order of St. Olav, and was invited to both help christen the new organ in Royal Albert Hall in London, as well as compose for the coronation of King Oscar II and Queen Sophie of Sweden. In 1883, he and his son started the Organist School in Oslo. Lindeman is perhaps best known for his arrangements of Norwegiam folk tales; over the course of his life he collected over 3000 folk melodies and tunes. Laura de Jong

William Dalrymple Maclagan

1826 - 1910 Person Name: William D. Maclagen Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Composer of "BREAD OF HEAVEN" in The Hymnal Maclagan, William Dalrymple , D.D., son of David Maclagan, M.D., was born in Edinburgh, June 18, 1826. In early life he entered the army, and served for some time in India. Retiring with the rank of lieutenant, he entered St. Peter's College, Cambridge, where he graduated B.A. 1856 and M.A. in 1860. Taking Holy Orders, he was curate of St. Saviour's, Paddington, 1856-58, and St. Stephen's, Marylebone, 1858-60. He then became Secretary to the London Diocesan Church Building Society, from 1860 to 1865; curate of Enfield, 1865-69; Rector of Newington, 1869-75; and Vicar of Kensington, 1875-78. He was also Hon. Chaplain to the Queen, and Prebendary of Reculverland in St. Paul's Cathedral, London. In 1878 he was consecrated Bishop of Lichfield. Bishop Maclagan's work has been mainly of a practical character, and his publications are few. The few hymns which he has written have been received with great favour, and create a desire for more of the same kind and quality. The following are in common use.:— 1. Again the trumpet sounds. Missions. Written about 1870. Appeared in the Hymns Ancient & Modern Hymns Ancient & Modern series of Hymns for Mission Services. 1871. 2. Be still, my soul, for God is near. Holy Communion. Part ii. is “O Body, broken for my sake." Written about 1873 for St. Mary's, Newington. In Thring's Collection, 1882. 3. Holy Spirit, Lord of love. Confirmation. Written about 1873, and published in Mrs. C. Brock's Children's Hymn Book, 1884. 4. It is finished, blessed Jesus [Saviour]. Good Friday. Written for Hymns Ancient & Modern, 1875. In several collections. 5. Lord, when Thy Kingdom comes, remember me. Good Friday. Written for the 1875 ed. of Hymns Ancient & Modern. Sometimes given in two parts: Pt. ii. Beginning, “Lord, when with dying lips my prayer is said." 6. The Saints of God their conflict past. All Saints. First published in Church Bells, 1870; and again in the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge Church Hymns, 1871. 7. What thanks and praise to Thee we owe. St. Luke. Written for the 1875 edition of Hymns Ancient & Modern These hymns are of more than usual merit, being characterized by great simplicity, tenderness, and fervour. The special season or purpose is clearly indicated, and its lessons earnestly enforced. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ============= Maclagan, Abp. W. D., pp. 709, i.; 1578, ii. At the present time all Abp. Maclagan's hymns are in common use, and most of his tunes likewise. With regard to the latter, it is exceptional to find so many tunes by the author of popular hymns sharing the same popularity in the principal hymnals. In Church Hymnal, 1903, and Hymns Ancient & Modern, 1904, combined, there are eight of his tunes, whilst the hymns are six in all. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Ray Palmer

1808 - 1887 Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Author of "Jesus, Lamb of God, for Me" in The Cyber Hymnal Ray Palmer (b. Little Compton, RI, 1808; d. Newark, NJ, 1887) is often considered to be one of America's best nineteenth-century hymn writers. After completing grammar school he worked in a Boston dry goods store, but a religious awakening prodded him to study for the ministry. He attended Yale College (supporting himself by teaching) and was ordained in 1835. A pastor in Congregational churches in Bath, Maine (1835-1850), and Albany, New York (1850-1865), he also served as secretary of the American Congregational Union (1865-1878). Palmer was a popular preacher and author, writing original poetry as well as translating hymns. He published several volumes of poetry and hymns, including Sabbath Hymn Book (1858), Hymns and Sacred Pieces (1865), and Hymns of My Holy Hours (1868). His complete poetical works were published in 1876. Bert Polman =================== Palmer, Ray, D.D., son of the Hon. Thomas Palmer, a Judge in Rhode Island, was born at Little Compton, Rhode Island, Nov. 12, 1808. His early life was spent at Boston, where he was for some time clerk in a dry-goods store. At Boston he joined the Park Street Congregational Church, then under the pastoral care of Dr. S. E. Dwight. After spending three years at Phillips Academy, Andover, he entered Yale College, New Haven, where he graduated in 1830. In 1835 he became pastor of the Central Congregational Church, Bath, Maine. During his pastorate there he visited Europe in 1847. In 1850 he was appointed to the First Congregational Church, at Albany, New York, and in 1865 Corresponding Secretary to the American Congregational Union, New York. He resigned in 1878, and retired to Newark, New Jersey. He died at Newark, Mar. 29, 1887. Dr. Palmer's published works in prose and verse include:-- (1) Memoirs and Select Remains of Charles Pond, 1829; (2) The Spirit's Life, a Poem, 1837; (3) How to Live, or Memoirs of Mrs. C. L. Watson, 1839; (4) Doctrinal Text Book, 1839; (5) Spiritual Improvement, 1839, republished as Closet Hours in 185; (6) What is Truth? or Hints on the Formation of Religious Opinions, 1860; (7) Remember Me, or The Holy Communion, 1865; (8) Hymns and Sacred Pieces, with Miscellaneous Poems, 1865; (9) Hymns of my Holy Hours, and Other Pieces, 1868; (10) Home, or the Unlost Paradise, 1873; and (11) Voices of Hope and Gladness, 1881. Most of Dr. Palmer's hymns have passed into congregational use, and have won great acceptance. The best of them by their combination of thought, poetry, and devotion, are superior to almost all others of American origin. The first which he wrote has become the most widely known of all. It is:— 1. My faith looks up to Thee. Faith in Christ. This hymn was written by the author when fresh from College, and during an engagement in teaching in New York. This was in 1830. The author says concerning its composition, "I gave form to what I felt, by writing, with little effort, the stanzas. I recollect I wrote them with very tender emotion, and ended the last line with tears." A short time afterwards the hymn was given to Dr. Lowell Mason for use, if thought good, in a work then being compiled by him and Dr. T. Hastings. In 1831 that work was published as Spiritual Songs for Social Worship: adapted to the use of Families, &c. Words and Music arranged by Thomas Hastings, of New York, and Lowell Mason of Boston. It is No. 141 in 4 stanzas of 8 lines, entitled "Self Consecration," and accompanied with the tune by Dr. L. Mason, there given as "My faith looks up to Thee, "but subsequently known as Olivet. (Orig. text of hymn in Thring's Collection, 1882.) It has passed into most modern collections in all English-speaking countries, and has been rendered into numerous languages. That in Latin, by H. M. Macgill (p. 708, ii.), begins "Fides Te mea spectat." 2. Fount of everlasting love. Praise for renewed Spiritual Life. This also appeared in the Spiritual Songs, &c, 1831, No. 191, in 4 stanzas of 4 lines, and headed "Praise for a Revival." The hymns which are given below are all in Dr. Palmer's Poetical Works, N. Y., 1876, and the dates appended in brackets are those given by him in that work. 3. Thou who roll'st the year around. (1832.) Close of the Year. In several American collections. 4. Away from earth my spirit turns. (1833.) Holy Communion. Appeared in Lowell Mason's Union Hymns, in 4 stanzas of 4 lines. In the Church Praise Book, N. Y.. 1882, it begins with st. ii., "Thou, Saviour, art the Living Bread." 5. Before Thy throne with tearful eyes. (1834.) Liberty of Faith. 6. Stealing from the world away. (1834.) Evening. Written at New Haven in 1834, and is very popular in America. 7. Thine [Thy] holy day's returning. (1834.) Sunday Morning. 8. Wake thee, 0 Zion. (1862.) Zion Exultant. 9. We stand in deep repentance. (1834.) Lent. This last, No. 9, in common with Nos. 10, 11, 12, is marked "original," in the Presbyterian Parish Hymns, 1843. Probably they were given to the editors of that book in manuscript, and had not previously appeared. 10. And is there, Lord, a rest? (1843.) Rest in Heaven. Written at Bath, Maine, in 1843. 11. 0 sweetly breathe the lyres above. Consecration to Christ. This was accidentally omitted from Dr. Palmer's Poetical Works, 18?6. S. W. Duffield says:— "It was written in the winter of 1842-43, at a time of revival. At the previous Communion several had been received under circumstances that made Doddridge's hymn, ‘0 happy day that fixed my choice 'a most appropriate selection. Not caring to repeat it, and needing something similar, Dr. Palmer composed the present hymn." English Hymns, N. Y., 1886, p. 432. 12. When downward to the darksome tomb. (1842.) Death Contemplated. Written at Bath, Maine, 1842. From 1843 there comes a long break, and Dr. Palmer seems to have done no more hymn-writing until called upon by Professors Park and Phelps, of Andover, for contributions to their Sabbath Hymn-Book, 1858. His hymns written for that important collection rank amongst the best that America has produced. This is specially true of the first four (Nos. 13-16) from the Latin. 13. Jesus, Thou joy of loving hearts. (l858.) Translation of a cento from "Jesu dulcis memoria" (p. 588, ii.). 14. 0 Bread to Pilgrims given. (1858.) Translation of “O esca viatorum" (q.v.). 15. 0 Christ our King, Creator Lord. (1858.) Translation of “Rex Christe, factor omnium " 16. Come Holy Ghost, in love. (1858.) Translation of “Veni Sancte Spiritus" (q.v.) 17. Jesus, these eyes have never seen. (1858.) Christ loved, though unseen. This hymn is accounted by many as next in merit and beauty to "My faith looks up to Thee." 18. Lord, my weak thought in vain would climb. (1858.) God Unsearchable. This hymn deals with the mysteries of Predestination in a reverent and devout manner. 19. Thy Father's house! thine own bright home. (1858.) Heaven. The next group, Nos. 20-27, appeared in Dr. Robinson's Songs for the Sanctuary, 1865. 20. Lord, Thou wilt bring the joyful day. (1864.) Contemplation of Heaven. Written in New York City. 21. Eternal Father, Thou hast said. (i860.) Missions. 22. Jesus, Lamb of God, for me. (1863.) Jesus, the Way of Salvation. Written in Albany, New York. 23. Take me, 0 my Father, take me. (1864.) Lent. 24. Wouldst thou eternal life obtain. (1864.) Good Friday. 25. Come Jesus, Redeemer, abide Thou with me. (1864.) Holy Communion. 26. Lord, Thou on earth didst love Thine own. (1864.) Fellowship with Christ. 27. Thou, Saviour, from Thy throne on high. (1864.) Prayer. The next four (Nos. 28-31) present another group. They appeared in D. E. Jones's Songs for the New Life, 1869, and the Reformed Dutch Hymns of the Church, N. Y., 1869. The dates of composition are from Dr. Palmer's Poems, 1876. 28. Lord, Thou hast taught our hearts to glow. (1865.) Ordination, or Meeting of Ministers. 29. When inward turns my searching gaze. (1868.) Evening. 30. 0 Jesus, sweet the tears I shed. (1867.) Good Friday. 31. Jesus, this [my] heart within me burns. (1868.) Love. The hymns which follow are from various sources. 32. 0 Christ, the Lord of heaven, to Thee. (1867.) Universal Praise to Christ. Appeared in the author's Hymns of my Holy Hours, 1867. It is a hymn of great merit, and is widely used. 33. Behold the shade of night is now receding. (1869.) A translation of "Ecce jam noctis." (p. 320, i., and Various). 34. Hid evening shadows let us all be waking. (1869.) A translation of "Nocte surgentes" (p. 809, i.). 35. I give my heart to Thee. (Aug. 20, 1868.) A translation of "Cor meum Tibi dedo," p. 262, ii. 36. Holy Ghost, that promised came. (1873.) Whitsuntide. From the author's Poems, 1876. 37. 0 Holy Comforter, I hear. The Comforter. Appeared in the Boston Congregationalist, September 7th, 1867. 38. Lord, when my soul her secrets doth reveal. (1865.) Holy Communion. Most of the foregoing hymns are in common in Great Britain, and all are found in one or more American hymnbooks of importance. [Rev. F. M. Bird, M.A.] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) =================== Palmer, Ray, D.D., p. 877, i. The following original hymns by Dr. Palmer are also in common use:— 1. O Rock of Ages, since on Thee. Faith. From his Poetical Works, 1876, p. 27, where it is dated 1869. Bp. Bickersteth says "This hymn"... is "worthy of Luther." (Note Hymnal Companion, ed. 1876.) 2. Thy holy will, my God, be mine. Resignation. From his Hymns of my Holy Hours, &c, 1868, p. 47. Also in his P. Works, 1876, dated 1867. 3. We praise Thee, Saviour, for Thy grace. Holy Communion. From his Hymns and Sacred Pieces, &c, 1865. Also in P. Works, 1876, dated 1864. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ========== Ray Palmer was born at Little Compton, Rhode Island, in 1808. He studied at Phillip's Academy, Andover, Mass., and graduated at Yale College in 1830. In 1835, he was ordained pastor of a Congregational Society in Bath, Maine, from which he removed, in 1850, to the pastorate of a Congregational Society in Albany, N.Y. He has published many hymns, some of his own authorship, and some translations. He has published some sermons and reviews. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872.

Johann G. Ebeling

1637 - 1676 Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Composer of "VOLLER WUNDER" in The Lutheran Hymnal Johann George Ebeling Germany 1637-1676. Born at Luneburg, Germany, he studied theology at the University of Helmstedt. He was a composer, author, editor, and collector of music. In 1660 he became head of the Hamburg Collegium, and in 1662 cantor of St. Nicholas Church in Berlin. In 1667 he begam teaching music and Greek in Stettin. He wrote choruses, chorales, cantatas, instrumentals oratorios, requiems and music for over 100 lyrics of Paul Gerhardt. He also wrote about music history. 278 works. He died in Stettin. John Perry

Thomas M. Westrup

1837 - 1909 Person Name: T. M. Westrup Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Translator of "Roca de la eternidad" in Mil Voces para Celebrar Thomas Martin Westrup moved with his family from London to Mexico when he was fifteen years old. He translated hundreds of hymns and, along with his son, Enrique, published a three-volume hymnal Incienso Christiano. Dianne Shapiro from Celebremos su Gloria (Colombia/Illinois: Libros Alianza/Celebration), 1992

Christopher M. Idle

b. 1938 Person Name: Christopher M. Idle, b. 1938 Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7 Author of "Who Can Measure Heaven and Earth" in RitualSong (2nd ed.) Christopher Martin Idle (b. Bromley, Kent, England, 1938) was educated at Elthan College, St. Peter's College, Oxford, and Clifton Theological College in Bristol, and was ordained in the Church of England. He served churches in Barrow-in-­Furness, Cumbria; London; and Oakley, Suffolk; and recently returned to London, where he is involved in various hymnal projects. A prolific author of articles on the Christian's public responsibilities, Idle has also published The Lion Book of Favorite Hymns (1980) and at least one hundred of his own hymns and biblical paraphrases. Some of his texts first appeared in hymnals published by the Jubilate Group, with which he is associated. He was also editor of Anglican Praise (1987). In 1998 Hope Publishing released Light Upon the River, a collection of 279 of his psalm and hymn texts, along with suggested tunes, scripture references, and commentary. Bert Polman

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