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Scripture:2 Corinthians 12:2-10
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Louis M. Gottschalk

1829 - 1869 Scripture: 2 Corinthians 12:9 Composer of "GOTTSCHALK (MERCY)" in The Hymnal Louis Moreau Gottschalk USA 1829-1869. Born in New Orleans, LA, to a Jewish father and Creole mother, he had six siblings and half-siblings. They lived in a small cottage in New Orleans. He later moved in with relatives (his grandmother and a nurse). He played the piano from an early age and was soon recognized as a prodigy by new Orleans bourgeois establishments. He made a performance debut at the new St. Charles Hotel in 1840. At 13 he left the U.S. And went to Europe with his father, as they realized he needed classical training to fulfill his musical ambitions. The Paris Conservatory rejected him without hearing him play on the grounds of his nationality. Chopin heard him play a concert there and remarked, “Give me your hand, my child, I predict that you will become the king of pianists. Franz Liszt and Charles Valentin Alkan also recognized his extreme talent. He became a composer and piano virtuoso, traveling far and wide performing, first back to the U.S., then Cuba, Puerto Rico, Central and South America. He was taken with music he heard in those places and composed his own. He returned to the States, resting in NJ, then went to New York City. There he mentored a young Venezuelan student, Carreno, and became concerned that she succeed. He was only able to give her a few lessons, yet she would remember him fondly and play his music the rest of her days. A year after meeting Gottschalk, she performed for President Lincoln and went on to become a renowned concern pianist, earning the nickname “Valkyrie of the Piano”. Gottschalk was also interested in art and made connections with notable figures of the New York art world. He traded one of his compositions to his art friend, Frederic Church, for one of Church's landscape paintings. By 1860 Gootschalk had established himself as the best known pianist in the New World. He supported the Union cause during the Civil War and returned to New Orleans only occasionally for concerts. He traveled some 95,000 miles and gave 1000 concerts by 1965. He was forced to leave the U.S. later that year as a result of a scandelous affair with a student at Oakland Female Seminary in Oakland, CA. He never came back to the U.S. He went to South America giving frequent concerts. At one, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, he collapsed from yellow fever as he played a concert. He died three weeks later, never recovering from the collapse, possibly from an overdose of quinine or an abdominal infection. He was buried in Brooklyn, NY. Though some of his works were destroyed or disappeared after his death, a number of them remain and have been recorded by various artists. John Perry

Elizabeth Lee Smith

1817 - 1898 Person Name: Elizabeth Lee Smith, 1817-98 Scripture: 2 Corinthians 12:8-11 Translator of "I greet you my Redeemer sure, who lives" in Together in Song Smith, Elizabeth Lee, née Allen, daughter of Dr. W. Allen, President of Dartmouth University, was born in 1817, and married in 1843 to Dr. H. B. Smith, who became Professor in Union Theological Seminary, New York, in 1850, and died in 1877. Mrs. Smith's hymns, including translations of "Je Te salue", “O Jesus Christus", are in Schaff's Christ in Song, 1869 and 1870. [Rev. F. M. Bird, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) According to the Canterbury Dictionary of Hymnology, Elizabeth Lee Smith passed away in 1898. "Elizabeth Lee Smith." The Canterbury Dictionary of Hymnology. Canterbury Press. Web. 19 Apr. 2018. http://www.hymnology.co.uk/e/elizabeth-lee-smith.

Fred Pratt Green

1903 - 2000 Person Name: Fred Pratt Green, 1903-2000 Scripture: 2 Corinthians 12:7-10 Author of "O Christ, the Healer, We Have Come" in Worship and Rejoice The name of the Rev. F. Pratt Green is one of the best-known of the contemporary school of hymnwriters in the British Isles. His name and writings appear in practically every new hymnal and "hymn supplement" wherever English is spoken and sung. And now they are appearing in American hymnals, poetry magazines, and anthologies. Mr. Green was born in Liverpool, England, in 1903. Ordained in the British Methodist ministry, he has been pastor and district superintendent in Brighton and York, and now served in Norwich. There he continued to write new hymns "that fill the gap between the hymns of the first part of this century and the 'far-out' compositions that have crowded into some churches in the last decade or more." --Seven New Hymns of Hope , 1971. Used by permission.

Samuel Webbe

1740 - 1816 Person Name: Samuel Webbe, the elder, 1740-1816 Scripture: 2 Corinthians 12:9 Composer of "MELCOMBE" in Singing the Faith Samuel Webbe (the elder; b. London, England, 1740; d. London, 1816) Webbe's father died soon after Samuel was born without providing financial security for the family. Thus Webbe received little education and was apprenticed to a cabinet­maker at the age of eleven. However, he was determined to study and taught himself Latin, Greek, Hebrew, French, German, and Italian while working on his apprentice­ship. He also worked as a music copyist and received musical training from Carl Barbant, organist at the Bavarian Embassy. Restricted at this time in England, Roman Catholic worship was freely permitted in the foreign embassies. Because Webbe was Roman Catholic, he became organist at the Portuguese Chapel and later at the Sardinian and Spanish chapels in their respective embassies. He wrote much music for Roman Catholic services and composed hymn tunes, motets, and madrigals. Webbe is considered an outstanding composer of glees and catches, as is evident in his nine published collections of these smaller choral works. He also published A Collection of Sacred Music (c. 1790), A Collection of Masses for Small Choirs (1792), and, with his son Samuel (the younger), Antiphons in Six Books of Anthems (1818). Bert Polman

Balthasar Münter

1735 - 1793 Person Name: B. Münter, 1735-1793 Scripture: 2 Corinthians 12:9 Author of "Mein glaub ist meines lebens ruh" in Deutsches Gesangbuch für die Evangelisch-Luterische Kirche in den Vereinigten Staaten Münter (Muenter), Balthasar , born of Lorenz Münter, merchant in Lübeck, was born at Lübeck, March 24, 1735. He entered the University of Jena as a student of theology in 1754, graduated M.A. in 1757, and thereafter became lecturer and adjunct of the philosophical faculty. In 1760, Duke Friedrich III., of Gotha, appointed him assistant court preacher, and preacher at the Orphanage in Gotha, and then, in 1763, Superintendent at Tonna (Gräfen-Tonna) near Gotha. In 1765 he became first preacher at the German Church of St. Peter in Copen¬hagen, receiving, in 1767, the degree of d.d. from the University. He died at Copenhagen, Oct. 5, 1793 (Koch vi. 348; Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie xxiii. 33, &c). Münter was a very popular and influential preacher, a true pastor and teacher of practical Christianity, a successful religions instruptor of children, an active friend of the poor, a man of culture and one of the most prominent figures in the literary society of Copenhagen. His hymns, 100 in number, are among the best of the period, were highly esteemed by his contemporaries, and many still survive in German hymnals compiled before 1876 and still in use. They appeared in his two works: (1) Geistliche Lieder. Leipzig, 1772. (2) Zwote Sammlung Geistlicher Lieder . Leipzig, 1774. [Both in Royal Library, Berlin.] In 1773, the first 60 were republished at Leipzig set to melodies composed for them by the most famous musicians of the day; and the second 50 were republished at Leipzig in 1774 set to melodies composed for them by J. C. F. Bach, of Bückeburg. Of Münter's hymns the following have passed into English:— i. Seht welch' ein Mensch! Wie lag so schwer. Christ before Pilate . 1774, No. 6, p. 21, in 10 st. of 7 1. Included in full in the Schleswig Holstein Gesang-Buch 1780; and, reduced to 5 st., in the Berlin Gesang-Buch, 1829. Translated as :— Behold the Man! How heavy lay. In full, by Dr. H. Mills, in his Horae Germanica, 1845 (1856, p. 307), repeated, abridged, in the American Lutheran General Synod's Collection , 1850, and the Ohio Lutheran Hymnal, 1880. ii. Zitternd, doch voll sanfter Freuden. Holy Communion . 1772, No. 19, p. 67, in 9 st. of 8 1., entitled "Communion Hymn” In the Berlin Gesang-Buch

Dennis L. Jernigan

b. 1959 Person Name: Dennis L. Jernigan, 1959- Scripture: 2 Corinthians 12:10 Author of "You Are My All in All" in Worship and Rejoice Born: 1959, Sapulpa, Oklahoma. You may not recognize the name or the face of Dennis Jernigan, but there is a good chance you know some of his music. Songs like “We Will Worship the Lamb of Glory”, “Thank You”, “Great is the Lord Almighty”, “Who Can Satisfy My Soul (There is a Fountain), “I Belong to Jesus”, “Nobody Fills My Heart Like Jesus”, and “You Are My All in All” have been sung widely by the body of Christ since the early 1990s. Having written hundreds of songs (even though Jernigan does not see himself as a song writer but, rather, a song “receiver”), there is so much more to the man than simply a musician. Dennis has given a great deal of his life to setting the spiritually captive free. Having walked out of a homosexual identity and into that of a new creation, he is convinced that with God NOTHING is impossible. Through the sharing of his story and the sharing of the stories behind the songs, Dennis Jernigan has watched literally thousands walk out of all manner of spiritual bondage and has watched literally thousands of desperate, wounded people find healing through intimacy with Jesus Christ. If you lead people to freedom, they WILL worship. Dennis Jernigan has been married to Melinda for 29 years. Together they have nine children (and no, they are not Mormon or Catholic and the children are not adopted…and yes, they know what causes that…and yes, they like it!). The Jernigans decided a long time ago that Dennis’s first priority was that of husband and father so he never truly toured and they chose not to live in Nashville…not that there’s anything wrong with any of that! This was simply the Jernigan’s mandate from the Lord as they saw it. Perhaps that’s why you do not know who he is. And that’s just fine with him. The life message of Dennis Jernigan can be summed up in one word. Freedom. That freedom has come with a price. Jernigan was born again through his faith in Jesus Christ…but the reality is that the battle for freedom from the lies of the enemy regarding his past identity has been ongoing. His greatest joy has come in seeking intimacy with Jesus Christ – and in the process, discovering greater depths of freedom than he ever realized. http://www.dennisjernigan.com/aboutdj (excerpts)

Rory Cooney

b. 1952 Scripture: 2 Corinthians 12:9 Author of "My Soul Cries Out (Canticle of the Turning)" in More Voices

E. Margaret Clarkson

1915 - 2008 Person Name: Margaret Clarkson Scripture: 2 Corinthians 12:9 Author of "So Send I You -- by Grace Made Strong" in The Worshiping Church

Michael Ledner

b. 1952 Person Name: Michael Ledner, twentieth century Scripture: 2 Corinthians 12:10 Author of "You Are My Hiding Place" in The Covenant Hymnal

Christian Fürchtegott Gellert

1715 - 1769 Person Name: Gellert Scripture: 2 Corinthians 12:9 Author of "Du fühlst, o christ, das leiden" in Deutsches Gesangbuch für die Evangelisch-Luterische Kirche in den Vereinigten Staaten Gellert, Christian Fürchtegott, son of Christian Gellert, pastor at Hainichen in the Saxon Harz, near Freiberg, was born at Hainichen, July 4, 1715. In 1734 he entered the University of Leipzig as a student of theology, and after completing his course acted for some time as assistant to his father. But then, as now, sermons preached from manuscript were not tolerated in the Lutheran Church, and as his memory was treacherous, he found himself compelled to try some other profession. In 1739 he became domestic tutor to the sons of Herr von Lüttichau, near Dresden, and in 1741 returned to Leipzig to superintend the studies of a nephew at the University. He also resumed his own studies. He graduated M.A. 1744; became in 1745 private tutor or lecturer in the philosophical faculty; and was in 1751 appointed extraordinary professor of philosophy, lecturing on poetry and rhetoric, and then on moral philosophy. An ordinary professorship offered to him in 1761 he refused, as he did not feel strong enough to fulfil its duties, having been delicate from a child, and after 1752 suffering very greatly from hypochondria. He died at Leipzig, Dec. 13, 1769 (Koch, vi. 263-277; Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie, viii. 544-549, &c). As a professor, Gellert was most popular, numbering Goethe and Lessing among his pupils, and won from his students extraordinary reverence and affection, due partly to the warm interest he took in their personal conduct and welfare. In his early life he was one of the contributors to the Bremer Beiträge; and was one of the leaders in the revolt against the domination of Gottsched and the writers of the French school. His Fables (1st Ser. 1746; 2nd 1748), by their charm of style, spirit, humour and point, may justly be characterised as epoch-making, won for him universal esteem and influence among his contemporaries of all classes, and still rank among the classics of German literature. As a hymnwriter he also marks an epoch; and while in the revival of churchly feeling the hymns of the Rationalistic period of 1760 to 1820 have been ignored by many recent compilers, yet the greatest admirers of the old standard hymns have been fain to stretch their area of selection from Luther to Gellert. He prepared himself by prayer for their composition, and selected the moments when his mental horizon was most unclouded. He was distinguished by deep and sincere piety, blameless life, and regularity in attendance on the services of the Church. His hymns are the utterances of a sincere Christian morality, not very elevated or enthusiastic, but genuine expressions of his own feelings and experiences; and what in them he preached he also put in practice in his daily life. Many are too didactic in tone, reading like versifications of portions of his lectures on morals, and are only suited for private use. But in regard to his best hymns, it may safely be said that their rational piety and good taste, combined with a certain earnestness and pathos, entitle them to a place among the classics of German hymnody. They exactly met the requirements of the time, won universal admiration, and speedily passed into the hymnbooks in use over all Germany, Roman Catholic as well as Lutheran. Two of Gellert's hymns are noted under their own first lines, viz., "Jesus lebt, mit ihm auch ich," and "Wie gross ist des All-mächtgen Güte." The following have also passed into English, almost all being taken from his Geistliche Oden und Lieder, a collection of 54 hymns first published at Leipzig, 1757, and which has passed through very numerous editions:— I. Hymns in English common use: i. An dir allein, an dir hab ich gesündigt. Lent. 1757, p. 102, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines, entitled "Hymn of Penitence." In Zollikofer's Gesange-Buch, 1766, and the Berlin Geistliche Lieder S., ed. 1863, No. 499. Translated as:— Against Thee only have I sinn'd, I own it. A good and full version, by Miss Wink worth, as No. 42 in her Chorale Book for England, 1863. Another translation is:— "Against Thee, Lord, Thee only my transgression," by N. L. Frothingham, 1870, p. 241. ii. Dies ist der Tag, den Gott gemacht. Christmas. One of his best and most popular hymns. 1757, p. 72, in 11 stanzas of 4 lines, repeated in the Berlin Gesang-Buch, 1765, No. 55, and the Berlin Geistliche Lieder S. ed. 1863, No. 154. Translated as:— This is the day the Lord hath made, O'er all the earth. A translation of stanzas i.-iii., x., by Miss Borthwick, as No. 22 in Dr. Pagenstecher's Collection, 1864, and included in Hymns from the Land of Luther, 1884, p. 256. Other trs. are:—(1) "This is the day which God ordains," by Dr. G. Walker, 1860, p. 27. (2) "This day shall yet by God's command," in the Family Treasury, 1811, p. 278. iii. Für alle Güte sei gepreist. Evening. 1757, p. 85, in 4 stanzas of 6 lines, included in Zollikofer's Gesang-Buch 1766, No. 78, and the Berlin Geistliche Lieder S., ed. 1863, No. 1160. Translated as:— To Father, Son, and Spirit praise. A good and full translation by A. T. Russell, as No. 7 in his Psalms & Hymns, 1851. Another translation is: — "For all Thy kindness laud I Thee," by H. J. Buckoll, 1842, p. 96. iv. Gott ist mein Lied. Praise. On God's Might and Providence. 1757, p. 78, in 15 st. of 5 1. In the Berlin Geistliche Lieder S.., ed. 1863, No. 24. Translated as:— God is my song, His praises I'll repeat, A free translation of stanzas i.-v., as No. 94 in Sir John Bowring's Hymns, 1825. Repeated, omitting stanza ii., as No. 114 in Dale's English Hymn Book, 1875. Other translations are:— (1) “Of God I sing," by Dr. H. Mills, 1856, p. 11. (2) "God is my song, With sovereign," by N. L. Frothingham, 1870, p. 243. v. Wenn ich, o Schöpfer, deine Macht. Praise. This fine hymn of Praise for Creation and Providence was first published 1757, p. 62, in 6 stanzas of 7 lines. In the Berlin Gesang-Buch, 1765, No. 25, and Berlin Geistliche Lieder S.ed. 1863, No. 72. Translated as:—- Thou Great First Cause! when of Thy skill. In full in Dr. H. Mills's Horae Germanicae, 1845 (1856, p. 5). Stanzas ii., iii., v., vi., altered and beginning, "The earth, where'er I turn mine eye," are in the American Lutheran General Synod's Collection, 1852. Other trs. are:— (1) "When, O my dearest Lord, I prove," by Miss Dunn, 1857, p. 80. (2) "Creator! when I see Thy might," in Madame de Pontes's Poets and Poetry of Germany, 1858, v. i. p. 472. (3) "When I, Creator, view Thy might," by Miss Manington, 1863. vi. Wer Gottes Wort nicht halt, und spricht. Faith in Works. This didactic hymn on Faith proved by Works, was first published 1757, p. 49, in 5 stanzas of 6 lines. In Zollikofer's Gesang-Buch, 1766, and the Berlin Geistliche Lieder S. ed. 1863, No. 72. Translated as:— Who keepeth not God's Word, yet saith. A good and full translation by Miss Winkworth, in her Lyra Germanica, 2nd Ser., 1858, p. 161. A greatly altered version of stanzas ii.—v., beginning, "True faith in holy life will shine," was included as No. 418 in Kennedy, 1863, and repeated in the Ibrox Hymnal 1871, J. L. Porter's Collection 1876, and others. II. Hymns not in English common use: vii. Auf Gott, und nicht auf meinen Rath. Trust in God's Providence. 1757, p. 134, in 6 stanzas. Translated as: (1) "Rule Thou my portion, Lord, my skill," by Dr. H. Mills, 1845 (1856, p. 164). (2) "On God and on no earthly trust," by J. D. Burns, in his Remains, 1869. viii. Auf, schicke dich. Christmas. 1757, p. 109, in 1 stanza. Translated as, "Come, tune your heart," by Miss Cox, 1841, p. 17 (1864, p. 39). ix. Dein Heil, o Christ! nicht zu verscherzen. Prayer. 1757, p. 6, in 14 stanzas of 8 lines. In J. A. Schlegel's Geistliche Gesänge, 3rd Ser., 1772, p. 193, recast as "Zu deinem Gotte beten," in 5 stanzas of 12 lines; and this in the Kaiserwerth Lieder-Buch für Kleinkinderschulen, 1842, No. 208, appears "Zu Gott im Himmel beten," in 8 stanzas of 4 lines. The 1842 was translated as, "O how sweet it is to pray," by Mrs. Bevan, 1859, p. 148. x. Der Tag ist wieder hin, und diesen Theil des Lebens. Evening. 1757, p. 13, in 10 stanzas, as "Self-Examination at Eventide." Translated as,"Another day is ended," by Miss Warner, 1869 (1871, p. 9). xi. Du klagst, und fühlest die Beschwerden. Contentment. 1757, p. 91, in 8 stanzas. Translated as "Thy wounded spirit feels its pain," by Dr. B. Maguire, 1883, p. 153. xii. Erinnre dich, mein Geist, erfreut. Easter. 1757, p. 27, in 13 stanzas. Translated as, "Awake, my soul, and hail the day," in Dr. J. D. Lang's Aurora Australis, Sydney, 1826, p. 43. xiii. Er ruft der Sonn, und schafft den Mond. New Year. 1757, p. 154, in 6 stanzas. In the Berlin Gesang-Buch, 1765, No. 233, as "Gott ruft." Translated as, “Lord, Thou that ever wast and art," in the British Magazine, Jan., 1838, p. 36. xiv. Gott, deine Güte reicht so weit. Supplication. 1757, p. 1, in 4 stanzas, founded on 1 Kings iii. 5-14. The translations are: (1) "O God, Thy goodness doth extend, Far as," by Dr. J. D. Lang, 1826, p. 10. (2) "Behold! Thy goodness, oh my God," by Miss Fry, 1845, p. 78. xv. Gott ist mein Hort. Holy Scripture. 1757, p. 70, in 8 stanzas. Translated as, "I trust the Lord, Upon His word," by Dr. H. Mills, 1845 (1856, p. 23). xvi. Herr, der du mir das Leben. Evening. 1757, p. 121, in 5 stanzas. Translated as, "By Thee, Thou Lord of Heaven," by H. J. Buckoll, 1842, p. 97. xvii. Herr, starke mich, dein Leiden su bedenken. Passiontide. 1757, p. 123, in 22 stanzas. Translated as, "Clothe me, oh Lord, with strength! that I may dwell” by Miss Fry, 1859, p. 153. xviii. Ich hab in guten Stunden. For the Sick. 1757, p. 128, in 6 stanzas. [See the Story of a Hymn, in the Sunday at Home for Sept., 1865.] Translated as: (1) “I have had my days of blessing," by Mrs. Findlater, in Hymns from the Land of Luther, 1855, p. 60. (2) "Once, happy hours with blessings crowned," by A. B. H., in the Day of Rest, 1877, p. 405. xix. Ich komme, Herr, und suche dich. Holy Communion. 1757, p. 89, in 5 stanzas. The translations are: (1) "I come, 0 Lord, and seek for Thee," by Miss Manington, 1863, p. 14. (2) “Weary and laden with my load, I come," by Dr. B. Maguire, 1872, p. 178. xx. Ich komme vor dein Angesicht. Supplication. 1757, p. 140. in 13 stanzas. The translations are: (1) "Great God, I bow before Thy face," by Dr. J. D. Lang, 1826, p. 23. (2) “Now in Thy presence I appear," by Dr. H. Mills, 1845 (1856, p. 137). xxi. Mein erst Gefühl sei Preis und Dank. Morning. 1757, p. 55, in 12 stanzas. Translated as, "I bless Thee, Lord, Thou God of might," beginning with st. vi., by H. J. Buckoll, 1842, p. 56. xxii. Nach einer Prüfung kurzer Tage. Eternal Life. 1757, p. 158, in 12 stanzas, as "The Consolation of Eternal Life." Though hardly a hymn for congregational use and too individualised, it has been a very great favourite in Germany. In the Berlin Gesang-Buch, 1765, 132, and the Berlin Geistliche Liedersegen, ed. 1863, No. 1483. The translations are: (1) "A few short days of trial past," in Miss Knight's Prayers and Hymns from the German, 1812 (1832, p. 107). (2) "A few short hours of transient joy," by Dr. J. D. Lang, 1826, p. 123. (3) “When these brief trial-days are past," by J. Sheppard, 1857, p. 98. (4) “A few short days of trial here,” by Miss Burlingham, in the British Herald, July 1865, p. 98. (5) "Our few short years of trial o'er," by Dr. J. Guthrie, 1869, d. 124. (6) “When these brief trial-days are spent," by Miss Winkworth, 1869, p. 318. (7) "A few more days, a few more years," by Dr. R. Maguire, 1883, p. 165. xxiii 0 Herr, mein Gott! durch den ich bin und lebe. Resignation to the will of God. 1757, p. 152. in 7 st. Translated as, "In Thee, my God, I live and move," by Dr. R. Maguire, 1883, p. 113. xxiv. So hoff’ ich denn mit festem Muth . Assurance of the Grace of God. 1757, p. 115, in 4 stanzas. The translations are: (1) "Firm is my hope of future good," by Dr. H. Mills, 1845 (1856, p. 188). (2) “In Thee, O Lord, my hope hath stood," by Dr. R. Maguire, 1872. zzv. Was ists dast ich mich quäle. Patience. 1757, p. 17, in 7 stanzas. The translations are: (1) "O foolish heart, be still," by Miss Warner, 1858 (1861, p. 452), repeated in Bishop Ryle's Collection, 1860, No. 181 (2) “What billows these that o'er thee roll," by Dr. R. Maguire, 1872. xxvi. Wie sicher lebt der Mensch, der Staub. For the Dying. 1757, p. 149, in 14 stanzas. Translated as, "How heedless, how secure is man!" by Dr. H. Mills, 1845 (1856, p. 238). One or two recasts from Gellert's Lehrgedichte und Erzählungen, Leipzig, 1754, came into German common use, and one has passed into English, viz.:— xxvii. Mensch, der du Christus schmähst, was ist in ihrer Lehre. Love to Mankind. 1754, pp. 27-56, being a poem entitled “The Christian." A recast from portions of this made by J. S. Diterich, beginning "Gieb mir, O Gott, ein Herz," in 9 stanzas, appears as No. 219 in the Berlin Gesang-Buch, 1765; and has been translated as "Grant me, O God! a tender heart," by Miss Knight, 1812 (1832, p. 97). [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

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