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C. H. Dretzel › Tunes

Short Name: C. H. Dretzel
Full Name: Dretzel, Cornelius Heinrich, 1697-1775
Birth Year: 1697
Death Year: 1775

Born: (baptised).September 18, 1697 - Nuremberg, Bavaria, Germany
Died: May 7, 1755 - Nuremberg, Bavaria, Germany

The German composer, organist and musicographer, Cornelius Heinrich Dretzel, was a grandson of Georg Dretzel (c1610-after 1676; organist of St Michael, Schwäbisch Hall) and nephew of Valentin, the most important member of the family. A possible student of Johann Pachelbel's eldest son, C.H. Dretzel also studied with J.S. Bach in Weimar in 1716-1717. He appears to have spent his whole life in Nuremberg, his hometown, in various organists' posts: Frauenkirche, St Lorenz (from 1743) and St Sebald.

Cornelius Heinrich Dretzel's keyboard counterpoints and fugues were his forte having thoroughly emersed himself in the works of J. S. Bach. His reputation as a virtuoso player and contrapuntist is supported by his solo harpsichord concerto, Harmonische Ergötzung, influenced by J.S. Bach's Italian Concerto (BWV 971). Indeed Harmonische Ergötzung was long thought to be composed by J.S. Bach. An early version of the slow movement was entered into Schmeider as BWV 897:1. C.H. Dretzel's own "divertimenti" were thought to be lost until they were found in a collection that had belonged to Haydn. Of hymnological importance is his collection and commentary Des evangelishen Zions musicalische Harmonie (1731), which contains over 900 melodies, suspended over a continuous bass, most appealing in print for the first time in their local versions; the preface discusses the origin and development of the chorale.

--www.bach-cantatas.com/L


Tunes by C. H. Dretzel (10)AsInstancessort descendingIncipit
UNSER JESUS IN DER NACHTCornelius Heinrich Dretzel (Composer)112354 32576 54323
CULBACHC. H. Dretzel (Composer)113554 53117 7665
SO GEHST DU NUNKornelius Heinrich Dretzel (Composer)135544 33223 45653
WIR GLAUBEN ALL AN EINEN GOTT (33543)Cornelius H. Dretzel, 1697-1775 (Adapter)133543 22323 43221
KOMM, O KOMM, DU GEIST DES LEBENS (Dretzel)Cornelius Heinrich Dretzel (Composer)113556 71561 53421
KOMM, O KOMM, DU GEIST DES LEBENS (Bach)Dretzel (Composer)131251 27567 11223
ST. SEBALDC. H. Dretzel (Composer)212315 64323 12345
WEIMAR (Dretzel)Dretzel (Composer)211235 43225 76543
DRETZELC. H. Dretzel (Composer)615543 21176 7665
O DASS ICH TAUSEND ZUNGEN HÄTTE (Dretzel)K. H. Dretzel, 1697-1775 (Composer)2513125 43212 22355
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