Richard Baxter

Richard Baxter
From: cyberhymnal.org
Short Name: Richard Baxter
Full Name: Baxter, Richard, 1615-1691
Birth Year: 1615
Death Year: 1691

Baxter, Richard. Only s. of Richard Baxter, yeoman, Eaton Constantine, Shropshire, b. at Rowton, Shropshire, Nov. 12,1615. He was educated at Wroxeter School, and for a time held the Mastership of the Dudley Grammar School. On taking Holy Orders, he became, in 1640, Ourate of Kidderminster. Subsequently he was for some time chaplain to one of Cromwell's regiments. Through weakness he had to take an enforced rest, during which he wrote his Saints’ Everlasting Rest. On regaining his health he returned to Kidderminster, where he remained until 1660, when he removed to London. At the Restoration he became chaplain to Charles II and was offered the bishopric of Hereford, which he refused. On the passing of the Act of Uniformity, he retired from active duty as a Minister of the Church of England. In or about 1673 he took out a licence as a Nonconformist Minister and commenced lecturing in London. He d. Dec. 8, 1691. His prose works are very numerous. His poetical are :—

    (1) Poetical Fragments: Heart Imployment with God and Itself; The Concordant Discord of a Broken-healed Heart, tendon, Printed by T. Snowdon for B. Simmons, at the 3 Golden Cocks, &c, 1681 (2nd ed. 1689; 3rd ed. 1699). It consists of accounts of his religious experiences in verse, and is dated "London, at the Door of Eternity; Rich. Baxter, Aug. 1, 1681." (2) Additions to the Poetical Fragments of Rich. Baxter, written for himself, and Communicated to such as are more for serious Verse than smooth, London, Printed for B. Simmons at the Three Golden Cocks at the Westend of St. Pauls, 1683. (3) A Paraphrase on the Psalms, With other Hymns Left fitted for the Press, pub. the year following his death (1692). [Early English Hymnody, x., and English Psalters, 6 xii.] The Poetical Fragments were republished by Pickering, Lond., 1821. From this work his well-known hymn, " Now [Lord] it belongs not to my care," is taken (see "My whole, though broken, heart, O Lord.")

-John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

See also in:


Texts by Richard Baxter (23)sort descendingAsAuthority LanguagesInstances
All that exceptions save I loveRichard Baxter (Author)2
All this is just, Lord, I confessRichard Baxter (Author)2
And this is just, Lord, I confessRichard Baxter (Author)2
Christ leads me through no darker roomsRichard Baxter (Author)English24
Christ, who knows all his sheepRev. Richard Baxter (Author)English7
Come, Lord, when grace has made me meetRichard Baxter (Author)English3
Eternal God, whose name is loveRichard Baxter (Author)2
He wants not friends that hath thy loveRichard Baxter, 1615-1691 (Author)English19
Heaven is my roof, earth is my floorRichard Baxter (Author)1
I know that thou wast willing firstRichard Baxter (Author)2
If death shall bruise this springing seedRichard Baxter (Author)2
Lord, it belongs not to my careRichard Baxter (Author)English206
Lord, may we feel no anxious careRichard Baxter (Author)2
My Lord hath taught me how to wantRichard Baxter (Author)2
My soul, go boldly forthRichard Baxter (Author)9
My whole, though broken, heart, O LordRichard Baxter (Author)3
None lacks a friend who hath thy loveRichard Baxter (Author)English2
O God, how doth thy love and graceRichard Baxter (Author)2
They lack not friends who have thy loveRichard Baxter (Author)2
Wakaŋtaŋka Ate Kiŋ He yataŋpi yeRichard Baxter (Author)Dakota2
Why art thou, fainting soul, cast downRichard Baxter (Author)2
Would I long bear my heavy loadRichard Baxter (Author)2
Ye holy angels brightRichard Baxter, 1615-91 (Author)English84

See also...

Data Sources

Suggestions or corrections? Contact us



Advertisements


It looks like you are using an ad-blocker. Ad revenue helps keep us running. Please consider white-listing Hymnary.org or subscribing to eliminate ads entirely and help support Hymnary.org.