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8293. We Have Come To Worship You, O Lord

1 We have come to sing Your praises, Lord,
We have come to worship You;
We have come to hear Your still small voice
In ev’ry thing we do.
Teach us Your Holy Word, O Lord,
Your Wisdom and Your Pow’r;
We’ve come to set ourselves apart
For You this holy hour.

2 I have come to sing Your praises, Lord,
I have come to worship You;
I have come to hear Your still small voice
In ev’ry thing I do.
Teach me Your Holy Word, O Lord,
Your Wisdom and Your Pow’r;
I’ve come to set myself apart
For You this holy hour.

Text Information
First Line: We have come to sing Your praises, Lord
Title: We Have Come To Worship You, O Lord
Adapter: Scott Werdebaugh
Language: English
Source: Unknown source
Copyright: © 2009 Scott Werdebaugh These words and music may be freely reproduced or published for Christian worship or devotions, provided they are not altered, & this notice is on each copy. All other rights reserved.
Notes: I read some words to a similar chorus in a church bulletin some years ago and came up with this paraphrase and music. I have researched over the years looking to find the original score and composer and author of the original lyrics to give him/her the proper credit…but alas I have been unsuccessful in my search. I have long since lost that church bulletin so I only have my words to fall back on. This hymn is intended to be sung at the beginning of a worship service or just before a pastor’s message. The first stanza is first person plural, as an invitation to worship to the church congregation as a whole. The second stanza, in first person singular, is a more personal invitation to each individual congregant. Scott Werdebaugh, 2018
Tune Information
Name: [We have come to sing Your praises, Lord]
Composer: Scott Werdebaugh (2009)
Key: C Major
Copyright: © 2009 Scott Werdebaugh These words and music may be freely reproduced or published for Christian worship or devotions, provided they are not altered, & this notice is on each copy. All other rights reserved.



Media
Adobe Acrobat image: PDF
MIDI file: MIDI
Noteworthy Composer score: Noteworthy Composer Score

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